Program Model Print

General Education Program Model - 44 semester hours total

General education at Appalachian is anchored in the ideals and practices of liberal education and aims to prepare students to fulfill the responsibilities and meet the challenges presented by a changing world. By engaging in the discovery, interpretation, and creation of knowledge throughout the undergraduate curriculum and becoming involved in educationally focused co-curricular activities, students learn to adapt to new environments, integrate knowledge from diverse sources, and continue learning throughout their lives.

Capstone and Junior Writing are required in General Education, but the hours are counted in the major, not General Education.

First Year Seminar - 3 hours

HON 1515

(Honors students only)

HON 1515, Freshman Honors Seminar

An interdisciplinary special topics course taught by one or two professors. This Honors course is equivalent to UCO 1200 (First Year Seminar) and fulfills the general education first year seminar requirement. Students may not receive credit for both UCO 1200 and HON 1515. Instructors and content vary; may be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate

UCO 1200

(multiple course options)

UCO 1200, First Year Seminar
The First Year Seminar provides students with an introduction to the four goals of a liberal education at Appalachian State University. Specifically, students will practice (1) thinking critically and creatively and (2) communicating effectively. In addition, students will be introduced to the learning goals of (3) making local-to-global connections and (4) understanding responsibilities of community membership. While each First Year Seminar course engages a unique topic examined from multiple perspectives, each course also introduces students to a common set of transferable skills. As such, First Year Seminar facilitates student engagement with: fellow students, the university, the community, and the common reading; essential college-level research and information literacy skills; and the habits of rigorous study, intellectual growth, and lifelong learning. 
UCO MET

(beginning Fall 2012, open to students who transfer at least 30 s.h. AND are at least one year out of high school; students using this option will have 41 s.h. of General Education)

WGC 1103

(Watauga Global Community students only)

WRC 1103, Investigations: Local

An experiential, interdisciplinary study in the humanities and social sciences of significant local issues (historical, economic, social, cultural, ideological, aesthetic) and their relationships with regional, national, and global issues.

Quantitative Literacy - 4 hours

1 hour

MAT 1005
A Brief Introduction to Mathematics
1 hour
Spring

This course is an introduction to mathematical problem solving. Emphasis is on the development of conceptual understanding rather than on computational drill. Using appropriate computational tools, including computers, is fundamental to the course. All sections cover personal finance. MAT 1005 is not open to students with 4 hours of QL credit. Prerequisite: 3 hours of QL credit.

MAT 1005
A Brief Introduction to Mathematics
1 hour
Spring

This course is an introduction to mathematical problem solving. Emphasis is on the development of conceptual understanding rather than on computational drill. Using appropriate computational tools, including computers, is fundamental to the course. All sections cover personal finance. MAT 1005 is not open to students with 4 hours of QL credit. Prerequisite: 3 hours of QL credit.

STT 1805
A Brief Introduction to Statistics
1 hour
Spring

This course is an introduction to statistical thinking. Emphasis is on the development of conceptual understanding rather than on computational drill. Using appropriate computational tools, including computers, is fundamental to the course. The course will cover the statistical method, making and reading graphs, detecting bias, univariate statistics, categorical statistics, linear regression and some basic probability. STT 1805 is not open to students with 4 hours of QL credit. Prerequisite: 3 hours of QL credit.

STT 1805
A Brief Introduction to Statistics
1 hour
Spring

This course is an introduction to statistical thinking. Emphasis is on the development of conceptual understanding rather than on computational drill. Using appropriate computational tools, including computers, is fundamental to the course. The course will cover the statistical method, making and reading graphs, detecting bias, univariate statistics, categorical statistics, linear regression and some basic probability. STT 1805 is not open to students with 4 hours of QL credit. Prerequisite: 3 hours of QL credit.

3 hours

ECO 2100
Business and Economic Statistics I
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of statistical tools used to analyze business and economic problems. The major subject matter includes descriptive statistics, the concepts of probability, confidence intervals and hypothetical testing, and statistical comparisons of production and marketing Appalachian State University Undergraduate Bulletin 2009-2010 methods. Prerequisite: MAT 1030 or MAT 1020. (NUMERICAL DATA) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

ECO 2100
Business and Economic Statistics I
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of statistical tools used to analyze business and economic problems. The major subject matter includes descriptive statistics, the concepts of probability, confidence intervals and hypothetical testing, and statistical comparisons of production and marketing methods. Prerequisite: MAT 1035, MAT 1030 or MAT 1020.

ECO 2200
Business and Economic Statistics II
3 hours
Fall, Spring

Applications of statistical tools to a variety of business and economic situations. These tools include survey sampling methods, hypothesis testing using analysis of variance, regression and time-series analysis, and non-parametric statistics. Computer applications using current industry-standard statistical software programs are emphasized. Writing statistical reports is also emphasized. Prerequisites: ECO 2100 or STT 2810 or STT 2820.

MAT 1035
Business Mathematics with Calculus
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course is an overview of algebraic concepts and a thorough treatment of functions such as rational, logarithmic, and exponential, including an introduction to the concepts of differentiation with particular emphasis upon their applications to solving problems that arise in business, finance, and economics. This course is designed primarily for business and economics majors and is not open to mathematics majors or students with credit for MAT 1110.

STT 1810
Basic Statistics
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to statistical problem solving. Topics include organization and presentation of data; measures of location, variation, and association; the normal distribution, sampling distributions, and statistical inference. Emphasis will be on conceptual understanding and interpretation of results rather than theoretical development. Statistical software will be utilized in the analysis of data and in the development of statistical and probabilistic concepts. STT 1810 is not open to students with credit for STT 2810, STT 3850, or STT 4811. Prerequisite: MAT 1010 or equivalent. (NUMERICAL DATA; COMPUTER). (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

STT 1810
Basic Statistics
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to statistical problem solving. Topics include organization and presentation of data; measures of location, variation, and association; the normal distribution, sampling distributions, and statistical inference. Emphasis will be on conceptual understanding and interpretation of results rather than theoretical development. Statistical software will be utilized in the analysis of data and in the development of statistical and probabilistic concepts. STT 1810 is not open to students with credit for STT 2810, STT 2820, STT 3850, or STT 4811. Prerequisite: MAT 1010 or equivalent.

STT 2810
Introduction to Statistics
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to statistical problem solving and methodology. Topics include tabulation and graphical representations of univariate and bivariate data; probability, statistical distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Emphasis will be on conceptual understanding and interpretation of results rather than theoretical development. Statistical software will be utilized in the analysis of data and in the development of statistical and probabilistic concepts. STT 2810 is not open to students with credit for STT 1810, STT 3850, or STT 4811. Prerequisite: MAT 1010 or equivalent. (NUMERICAL DATA; COMPUTER). (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

STT 2810
Introduction to Statistics
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to statistical problem solving and methodology. Topics include tabulation and graphical representations of univariate and bivariate data; probability, statistical distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Emphasis will be on conceptual understanding and interpretation of results rather than theoretical development. Statistical software will be utilized in the analysis of data and in the development of statistical and probabilistic concepts. STT 2810 is not open to students with credit for STT 1810, STT 2820, STT 3850, or STT 4811. Prerequisite: MAT 1010 or equivalent.

STT 3820
Statistical Methods I
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A continuation of STT 2810 or STT 2820. A study of parametric and non-parametric statistical methods and inferential procedures. Topics include introduction to methods of data collection such as simulation, surveys and experiments; single-parameter inference for means and proportions; techniques for comparing two distributions; error rates and power; inference for simple linear regression models and multiple regression least squares models; one-way and two-way analysis of variance models; and contingency table analysis. Nonparametric alternatives are presented for many methods in the course when the assumptions for parametric methods are not met. Emphasis is on a non-theoretical development of statistical techniques and on the interpretation of statistical results. Statistical software will be utilized in analysis of data. Prerequisite: STT 2810 or STT 2820 or equivalent. (NUMERICAL DATA; COMPUTER) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

STT 3820
Statistical Methods I
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A continuation of STT 2810 or STT 2820. A study of parametric and non-parametric statistical methods and inferential procedures. Topics commonly covered include an introduction to methods of data collection such as simulation, surveys and experiments; single-parameter inference for means and proportions; techniques for comparing two distributions; error rates and power; inference for simple linear regression and multiple regression least squares models; introductions to one-way and two-way analysis of variance models; and contingency table analysis. Nonparametric alternatives are presented for many methods in the course when the assumptions for parametric methods are not met. Emphasis is on a non-theoretical development of statistical techniques and on the interpretation of statistical results. Statistical software will be utilized in analysis of data. Prerequisite: STT 2810 or STT 2820 or equivalent.

4 hours

C S 1445
Introduction to Programming with Interdisciplinary Applications
4 hours
On Demand

This course provides an introduction to problem solving and programming using tools such as MATLAB. The course emphasizes computational methods to solve scientific problems. Topics include: control structures, data types (including structures and arrays), parameterized procedures and recursion, as well as simple I/O control. Prerequisite: MAT 1020 or MAT 1025 or equivalent with a grade of "C-" or higher. Students with doubts about their mathematics and computing background should consider taking CS 1425 (Overview of Computer Science) as a prerequisite to CS 1445.

CS 1445
Introduction to Programming with Interdisciplinary Applications
4 hours
On Demand

This course provides an introduction to problem solving and programming using tools such as MATLAB. The course emphasizes computational methods to solve scientific problems. Topics include: control structures, data types (including structures and arrays), parameterized procedures and recursion, as well as simple I/O control. Prerequisite: MAT 1020 or MAT 1025 or equivalent with a grade of "C-" or higher. Students with doubts about their mathematics and computing background should consider taking CS 1425 (Overview of Computer Science) as a prerequisite to CS 1445. (COMPUTER)

MAT 1010
Introduction to Mathematics
4 hours
Fall, Spring

This course is an introduction to mathematical problem solving. Emphasis is on the development of conceptual understanding rather than on computational drill. Using appropriate computational tools, including computers, is fundamental to the course. All sections cover personal finance and consumer statistics. One or two additional modules come from such disciplines as ecology, art, music, astrophysics, cryptology, resource allocation, construction, and election theory. MAT 1010 is not open to students with credit for MAT 1020, MAT 1025, MAT 1030, or MAT 1110.

MAT 1010
Introduction to Mathematics
4 hours
Fall, Spring

This course is an introduction to mathematical problem solving. Emphasis is on the development of conceptual understanding rather than on computational drill. Using appropriate computational tools, including computers, is fundamental to the course. All sections cover personal finance and consumer statistics. One or two additional modules come from such disciplines as ecology, art, music, astrophysics, cryptology, resource allocation, construction, and election theory. MAT 1010 is not open to students with credit for MAT 1020, MAT 1025, MAT 1030, or MAT 1110. (CROSS DISCIPLINARY; NUMERICAL DATA; COMPUTER) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.) (CORE: MATHEMATICS)

MAT 1020
College Algebra with Applications
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of the algebraic concepts and their applications. Topics include algebraic relations and functions, equations, exponents and logarithms, inequalities, linear programming, and elementary probability. Problem solving will be emphasized throughout. Not open to students who have credit for MAT 1025, MAT 1030 or MAT 1110. Not appropriate preparation for MAT 1110. Prerequisite: must pass placement test or MAT 0010. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: MATHEMATICS) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

MAT 1020
College Algebra with Applications
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of the algebraic concepts and their applications. Topics include algebraic relations and functions, equations, exponents and logarithms, inequalities, linear programming, and elementary probability. Problem solving will be emphasized throughout. Not open to students who have credit for MAT 1025, MAT 1030 or MAT 1110. Not appropriate preparation for MAT 1110. Prerequisite: must pass placement test or MAT 0010.

MAT 1030
Calculus With Business Applications
4 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to the concepts of differentiation and integration with particular emphasis upon their applications to solving problems that arise in business and economics. This course is designed primarily for business and economics majors and is not open to mathematics majors or students with credit for MAT 1110. Prerequisite: MAT 1020 or MAT 1025 or equivalent. (NUMERICAL DATA; COMPUTER) (CORE: MATHEMATICS) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

MAT 1110
Calculus With Analytic Geometry I
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of limits, continuity, differentiation, applications of the derivative, the differential, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem, and applications of the definite integral. Prerequisite: MAT 1025 (with a grade of "C-" or higher) or equivalent. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: MATHEMATICS) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

MAT 1110
Calculus With Analytic Geometry I
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of limits, continuity, differentiation, applications of the derivative, the differential, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem, and applications of the definite integral. Prerequisite: MAT 1025 (with a grade of “C-” or higher) or equivalent.

STT 2820
Reasoning with Statistics
4 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to the design, analysis, and interpretation of statistical studies. Topics include representations for univariate and bivariate data distributions; designed methods for data collection and the role of randomness in statistical studies; probability and statistical distributions; statistical estimation, and statistical significance. Emphasis will be on the development of conceptual understanding and interpretation of results through simulation rather than a theoretical development. Statistical software will be utilized in the analysis of data in the development of statistical and probabilistic concepts. STT 2820 is not open to students with credit for STT 2810, STT 3850, or STT 4811. (NUMERICAL DATA; COMPUTER) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

STT 2820
Reasoning with Statistics
4 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to the design, analysis, and interpretation of statistical studies. Topics include representations for univariate and bivariate data distributions; designed methods for data collection and the role of randomness in statistical studies; probability and statistical distributions; statistical estimation, and statistical significance. Emphasis will be on the development of conceptual understanding and interpretation of results through simulation rather than a theoretical development. Statistical software will be utilized in the analysis of data in the development of statistical and probabilistic concepts. STT 2820 is not open to students with credit for STT 1810, STT 2810, STT 3850, or STT 4811.

WRC1010
Introduction to Mathematics for WRC
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A course in mathematical problem solving for students who are not required to take calculus. Emphasis is on the development of students' quantitative literacy and number sense rather than computational drill. Computational tools such as spreadsheets will be used to solve a variety of real world problems. All sections cover basic consumer statistics and probability, with additional topics drawn from a variety of fields such as art, music, finance, physical or biological science, geometry, cryptology, measurement, and election theory. Not open to students who are enrolled in or have credit for MAT 1010, MAT 1020, MAT 1030, or MAT 1110. Students may not receive credit for both WRC 1010 and MAT 1010 or MAT 1020.

Wellness Literacy - 2 hours

Health or Wellness Literacy is “the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions” (adapted from US Department of Health and Human Services). The person who is literate in wellness has a strong foundation in science-based health and fitness concepts, selects reliable sources of health and wellness content, and is capable of applying wellness skills.

1 hour

P E 1700
Swimming for Nonswimmers
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1703
Intermediate Swimming
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1704
Advanced Swimming
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1705
Open Water SCUBA Diving
1 hour
Fall, Spring

Fee charged.

P E 1706
Advanced Open Water SCUBA Diving
1 hour
Fall, Spring

Fee charged.

P E 1709
Water Aerobics
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1712
Swimming for Fitness
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1714
Water Polo
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1720
Hiking
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1721
Backpacking/Orienteering
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1724
Canoeing
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1725
Intermediate Canoeing
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1727
Fly Fishing
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1730
Intermediate Canoeing
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1731
Rock Climbing
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1732
Bouldering
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1733
Mountain Biking
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1734
Intermediate Mountain Biking
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1735
Whitewater Rafting
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1736
Introduction to Whitewater Kayaking
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1742
Aerobics
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1743
Intermediate Aerobics
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1745
Jogging/Conditioning
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1748
Tai Chi
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1751
Yoga
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1752
Intermediate Yoga
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1754
Weight Training
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1759
Indoor Cycling
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1770
Self-Defense
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1775
Fencing
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1780
Kung Fu
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1782
Arnis Stick Fighting
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1790
Basketball
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1791
Intermediate Basketball
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1793
Field Hockey
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1795
Flag Football
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1800
Disc Games
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1802
Soccer
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1810
Badminton
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1819
Raquetball
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1820
Intermediate Racquetball
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1822
Tennis
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1823
Intermediate Tennis
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1825
Volleyball
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1840
Softball
1 hour
Fall, Spring
P E 1873
Alpine Skiing
1 hour
Spring

Fee charged.

P E 1874
Intermediate Alpine Skiing
1 hour
Spring

Fee charged.

P E 1876
Alpine Snowboarding
1 hour
Spring

Fee charged.

P E 1877
Intermediate Alpine Snowboarding
1 hour
Spring

Fee charged.

PE 1530-1545
Selected Topics
1 hour
On Demand
PE 1700
Swimming for Nonswimmers
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1702
Beginning Swimming
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1703
Intermediate Swimming
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1704
Advanced Swimming
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1705
Open Water SCUBA Diving
1 hour
Fall, Spring

Fee charged

PE 1706
Advanced Open Water SCUBA Diving
1 hour
Fall, Spring

Fee charged

PE 1718
Lifeguarding and Water Safety
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1721
Backpacking/Orienteering
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1724
Canoeing
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1727
Introduction to Fly Fishing
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1730
Beginning Rock Wall Climbing
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1740
Physical Education for the Disabled
1 hour
On Demand
PE 1742
Aerobics
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1743
Intermediate Aerobics
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1745
Jogging/Conditioning
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1748
Beginning Tai Chi
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1751
Yoga
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1754
Intermediate Weight Training
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1754
Weight Training
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1755
Intermediate Weight Training
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1770
Self-Defense
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1775
Fencing
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1790
Basketball
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1793
Field Hockey
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1802
Soccer
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1810
Badminton
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1819
Raquetball
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1820
Intermediate Racquetball
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1823
Intermediate Tennis
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1825
Volleyball
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1840
Softball
1 hour
Fall, Spring
PE 1873
Beginning Skiing
1 hour
Spring

Fee charged

PE 1874
Intermediate Skiing
1 hour
Spring

Fee charged

PE 1876
Beginning Snowboarding
1 hour
Spring

Fee charged

PE 1877
Intermediate Snowboarding
1 hour
Spring

Fee charged

2 hours

DAN 1400
Modern Dance I
2 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to modern dance as an art form with the beginning practice of movement technique. Emphasis will be on the discovery of skills to develop the articulation and expressiveness of the body. The course will be an introduction to the medium of modern dance through the concepts of time, space, force and direction while integrating alignment and placement. Historical perspectives as well as aesthetic values will be covered. May be repeated one time for credit. (CORE: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY/WELLNESS)

DAN 1400
Modern Dance I
2 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to modern dance as an art form with the beginning practice of movement technique. Emphasis will be on the discovery of skills to develop the articulation and expressiveness of the body. The course will be an introduction to the medium of modern dance through the concepts of time, space, force and direction while integrating alignment and placement. Historical perspectives as well as aesthetic values will be covered. May be repeated one time for credit.

DAN 1410
Beginning Ballet I
2 hours
Fall, Spring

A beginning study of the art of classical ballet with emphasis on basic vocabulary, alignment/placement, classical historical traditions and basic combinations of movement. May be repeated one time for credit. (CORE: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY/WELLNESS)

DAN 1410
Beginning Ballet I
2 hours
Fall, Spring

A beginning study of the art of classical ballet with emphasis on basic vocabulary, alignment/placement, classical historical traditions and basic combinations of movement. May be repeated one time for credit.

DAN 1420
Jazz I
2 hours
Fall

A study of beginning jazz dance technique with an emphasis on rhythmic awareness, style and cultural traditions. May be repeated one time for credit. Prerequisite: DAN 1400 or DAN 1410. (CORE: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY/WELLNESS)

DAN 1420
Jazz I
2 hours
Fall

A study of beginning jazz dance technique with an emphasis on rhythmic awareness, style and cultural traditions. May be repeated one time for credit. Prerequisite: DAN 1400 or DAN 1410.

DAN 1430
African Dance
2 hours
Fall, Spring

This course is an introduction to the study of West African dance technique. The course emphasizes the movement
vocabulary of West African dance while also providing historical and cultural perspectives on cross cultural dance
styles. The course introduces students to the alignment, mechanics, musicality and performance qualities
associated with West African dance, while also addressing the central role dance plays in the socio-spiritual life of
African people. May be repeated one time for credit.

DAN 2400
Modern Dance II
2 hours
Fall, Spring

A second (intermediate) level study of modern technique and basic elements of dance with more emphasis given to the refinement of skills and aesthetic elements. May be repeated one time for credit. Prerequisite: DAN 1400 or permission of the instructor. (CORE: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY/WELLNESS)

DAN 2400
Modern Dance II
2 hours
Fall, Spring

A second (intermediate) level study of modern technique and basic elements of dance with more emphasis given to the refinement of skills and aesthetic elements. May be repeated one time for credit. Prerequisite: DAN 1400 or permission of the instructor.

DAN 2410
Ballet II
2 hours
Fall, Spring

An intermediate/advanced level study of the art of classical ballet technique facilitating skill in allegro and adagio work with an emphasis on developing line, style, placement and musicality. Focus will be on expanding the dancer's artistry through the development of articulation, precision and conditioning. May be repeated one time for credit. Prerequisite: DAN 1410 or permission of the instructor. (CORE: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY/WELLNESS)

DAN 2410
Ballet II
2 hours
Fall, Spring

A beginner/intermediate class in classical ballet technique designed to facilitate skill in allegro and adagio work with an emphasis on developing line, style, placement and musicality. Focus will be on expanding the dancer's artistry through the development of articulation, precision and conditioning. May be repeated for a total credit of four semester hours. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

DAN 2420
Jazz II
2 hours
Spring

A second level study of jazz technique and advanced elements of dance with more emphasis given to the refinement of skills including rhythmic awareness and dynamic interpretation. May be repeated one time for credit. Prerequisite: DAN 1420 or permission of the instructor. (CORE: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY/ WELLNESS)

DAN 2420
Jazz II
2 hours
Spring

A second level study of jazz technique and advanced elements of dance with more emphasis given to the refinement of skills including rhythmic awareness and dynamic interpretation. May be repeated one time for credit. Prerequisite: DAN 1420 or permission of the instructor.

DAN 3280
Yoga as Somatic Practice
2 hours
Spring

This course will examine the basic principles of the physical practice of yoga known as Hatha Yoga. The course will explore the practice of asanas (sustained postures) and vinyasas (sequences of postures connected by breath), pranayama (breathing exercises) and pratyahara, (meditation practices). Students will also be introduced to the philosophical and historical context of Hatha yoga. (CORE: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY/WELLNESS)

DAN 3280
Yoga as Somatic Practice
2 hours
Spring

This course will examine the basic principles of the physical practice of yoga known as Hatha Yoga. The course will explore the practice of asanas (sustained postures) and vinyasas (sequences of postures connected by breath), pranayama (breathing exercises) and pratyahara, (meditation practices). Students will also be introduced to the philosophical and historical context of Hatha yoga. May be repeated one time for credit.

DAN 3480
Pilates Conditioning I
2 hours
Fall, Spring

This course is an experiential course based on the principles and teachings of Joseph H. Pilates. The Pilates method combines both Eastern and Western approaches to physical and mental conditioning with an emphasis on moving with maximum efficiency and precise control. May be repeated one time for credit. (CORE: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY/WELLNESS)

DAN 3480
Pilates Conditioning I
2 hours
Fall, Spring

This course is an experiential course based on the principles and teachings of Joseph H. Pilates. The Pilates method combines both Eastern and Western approaches to physical and mental conditioning with an emphasis on moving with maximum efficiency and precise control. May be repeated one time for credit.

DAN 3580
Gyrokinesis
2 hours
Fall, Spring

Gyrokinesis methodology, as developed by Julio Horvath, embraces key principles of dance, yoga, gymnastics and tai-chi. The method works the entire body using spinal articulations and undulating rhythms integrated with specific breathing patterns. (CORE: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY/WELLNESS)

DAN 3580
Gyrokinesis
2 hours
Fall, Spring

Gyrokinesis methodology, as developed by Julio Horvath, embraces key principles of dance, yoga, gymnastics and tai-chi. The method works the entire body using spinal articulations and undulating rhythms integrated with specific breathing patterns. May be repeated one time for credit.

DAN 4580
Gyrotonic
2 hours
Spring

Gyrotonic methodology, as developed by Juliu Horvath, embraces key principles of dance, yoga, gymnastics and tai-chi. The method works the entire body using spinal articulations and undulating rhythms integrated with specific breathing patterns. This second level study incorporates the GYROTONIC® apparatus.
May be repeated for a total credit of four semester hours.
Prerequisite: DAN 3580.

HED 1000
Personal and Family Health
2 hours
Fall, Spring

This introductory course is tailored to meet the needs of college students and the distinct health and behavioral issues that they face in a college environment. Emphases will be placed on developing communication, decision-making and goal-setting skills in the areas of sexual health, alcohol, tobacco and other drug choices, physical activity and diet, as well as improving psychological health. (CORE: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY/WELLNESS)

HED 1000
Personal and Family Health
2 hours
Fall, Spring

This introductory course is tailored to meet the needs of college students and the distinct health and behavioral issues that they face in a college environment. Emphases will be placed on developing communication, decisionmaking and goal-setting skills in the areas of sexual health, alcohol, tobacco and other drug choices, physical activity and diet, as well as improving psychological health.

HP 1105
Health and Fitness
2 hours
Fall, Spring

Emphasis on health and fitness trends in America, fitness and health testing concepts, exercise prescription, nutrition principles, prevention and treatment of chronic diseases such as heart disease, obesity, cancer, diabetes mellitus, and osteoporosis, the relationship between health habits and aging and psychological health, stress management, and precautions in exercise. Each student will have their health and physical fitness status tested, including results on personal cardiorespiratory, body composition, and musculoskeletal fitness status, and personal diet, heart disease, health age, and stress profiles. (CORE: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY/WELLNESS)

HP 1105
Health and Fitness
2 hours
Fall, Spring

Emphasis on health and fitness trends in America, fitness and health testing concepts, exercise prescription, nutrition principles, prevention and treatment of chronic diseases such as heart disease, obesity, cancer, diabetes mellitus, and osteoporosis, the relationship between health habits and aging and psychological health, stress management, and precautions in exercise. Each student will have their health and physical fitness status tested, including results on personal cardiorespiratory, body composition, and musculoskeletal fitness status, and personal diet, heart disease, health age, and stress profiles.

MSL 1101
Army Physical Fitness
2 hours
Fall, Spring

This course trains students in the physical fitness standards identified by the U.S. Army. This includes education on how constructive personal choices promote fitness, health, and wellness. The course prepares Army ROTC cadets to meet and exceed the physical requirements of the Army, but is also open to non-ROTC students.

MSL 1101
Army Physical Fitness I
2 hours
Fall

This course, along with MSL 1102, is specifically designed to prepare Army ROTC cadets to meet and exceed the physical fitness requirements of the Army. The course satisfies Cadet Command's requirements that all contracted cadets receive physical training and maintain the Army's individual fitness standards. MSL 1101 is an excellent preparation for the physical requirements of the MSL 3000 level courses. The course is open to non-ROTC students.

3 hours

DAN 4460
Somatics
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This is a survey course exploring several different approaches to body-centered learning. A broad overview of current conditioning and therapeutic bodywork methods will be introduced and explored. The course will be lecture and experiential in nature. (CORE: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY/WELLNESS) [Dual-listed with DAN 5460.]

DAN 4460
Somatics
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course will focus on functional anatomy and kinesiology to explore different approaches to therapeutic body-centered learning and current concepts in wellness. The course will be lecture and experiential in nature. [Duallisted
with DAN 5460.] Dual-listed courses require senior standing; juniors may enroll with permission of the department.

HPE 4320
Nutrition and Health-Related Fitness
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course will focus on planning, implementation, and assessment of nutrition and health-related fitness in K-12 health and physical education. The course will address content and concepts in nutrition, with an emphasis on disease prevention (CVD, obesity, diabetes) and health promotion, as well as fitness concepts, principles, and strategies as they relate to maintenance of a health-enhancing level of physical activity and fitness. Prospective teachers completing this course will learn to apply instructional strategies to promote physical activity and fitness, healthy eating and weight management, and to assess students’ knowledge and skills in these areas. A minimum grade of “C” (2.0) is required. Prerequisites: HPE 3210, HPE 3220, HPE 3230 and HPE 3240 with a grade of “C” or higher in each.

NUT 2202
Nutrition and Health
3 hours
Fall, Spring

Application of basic nutrition principles to the prevention of disease and the promotion of health. The wellness perspective is integrated in the course through the following topics: chronic diseases, health risk assessment, decision making, health behavior change, wellness planning and evaluation, and literature evaluation. Lecture three hours. (CORE: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY/WELLNESS)

NUT 2202
Nutrition and Health
3 hours
Fall, Spring

Application of basic nutrition principles to the prevention of disease and the promotion of health. The wellness perspective is integrated in the course through the following topics: chronic diseases, health risk assessment, decision making, health behavior change, wellness planning and evaluation, and literature evaluation. Lecture three hours.

P E 1718
Lifeguarding and Water Safety
3 hours
Fall, Spring
P E 1769
Personal Trainer Training
3 hours
Fall, Spring
PE 1718
Lifeguarding and Water Safety Instructor
3 hours
Fall, Spring
PE 1768
Group Fitness Instructor Training
3 hours
Fall, Spring
PE 1769
Personal Trainer Training
3 hours
Fall, Spring
PE 3008
Planning, Implementation, and Assessment of Health Related Fitness
3 hours
Fall, Spring

1-4 hours

P E 1530-1549
Selected Topics
1-4 hours
Fall, Spring

Selected topics in Physical Education. 1-4 credit hours.

Perspectives - 29 hours

Hours: 
29 hours
Version: 
1

Within the Perspectives, students must complete at least 3 hours in each course designation:

  • Historical Studies
  • Literary Studies
  • Fine Arts

Historical Studies

Version: 
1

Courses that meet the Historical Studies designation will:

  • Introduce students to historical methodology, the process by which one locates, evaluates, and utilizes primary documents and other evidence to reconstruct and understand the past
  • Provide an understanding of historiography, or the study of the way history has been written. Students should understand that historical perspective changes with generations and that historical understandings and perspectives continue to evolve. Students should learn to reconcile multiple and competing perspectives.
  • Offer historical perspective to contextualize contemporary issues, and thus help students appreciate the continuum between past and present in order to understand the complexity and richness of the human experience
  • Offer a critical assessment of the manner in which humans have politically, socially, and culturally occupied space across time

Literary Studies

Version: 
1

Courses that meet the Literary Studies designation will:

  • Introduce students to the analytical and interpretive strategies of literary studies
  • Analyze the structural components and composition of various literary and cultural texts
  • Help students appreciate and interpret the language/linguistic artistry, the rhetoric, and/or the aesthetics of literary texts.
  • Identify and examine relevant contextual factors that influence the composition and reception of literary or other cultural texts

Fine Arts

Version: 
1

Courses that meet the Fine Arts designation will:

  • Develop interpretive skills and aesthetic discernment by closely examining individual works of art
  • Analyze the relationship between specific works of art and their historical, cultural, and/or artistic contexts
  • Analyze the structural components and composition of various works of art
  • Examine the creative process as exemplified by the distinct processes of various artists
  • Create artistic products and/or attend live performances or visual art exhibitions

Aesthetic - 6 or 9 hours

Analyzing Style and Form

The concepts of style and form are central to the study of creative expression. Courses in this theme would develop students' abilities to analyze forms of creative expression through a focus on structural studies of form and comparative analyses of various styles.

DAN 2010 (FA)
Analyzing Style and Form: Dance
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course will explore the meaning, history, and aesthetics of dance. It will include cross cultural comparisons and the influence of other art forms throughout the history of dance. The course will be primarily lecture with demonstrations, video, and some experiential work.

MUS 2011 (FA)
Analyzing Style and Form: Music
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A nontechnical course for students with little or no musical background. Emphasis is placed on the style and form of music as perceived by the listener. Lecture three hours. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

PHL 2013
Philosophy of Art
3 hours
Fall

A course that concentrates on the interplay of art and philosophy in ancient through contemporary cultures. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

THR 2010 (FA)
Analyzing Style and Form: Theatre
3 hours
Fall, Spring

In this course, students will analyze styles and forms of theatre from various cultures and historical eras. They will also examine how their own personal, historical, and cultural perspectives affect their responses to artistic performance.

Ancient Worlds

This theme explores a diverse range of prehistoric, ancient, and pre-modern peoples, the history and culture of such societies, and the methods and evidence used to study them.

REL 2010 (LS)
Biblical Literature: The Hebrew Scriptures
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An analysis of Old Testament literature as the product of the life of the Hebrew people, students will have the opportunity to examine selected documents in terms of their literary structure, historical context, and religious perspective. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

Creative Expressions of Culture

In this theme, students will explore the various ways a culture, or cultures, use literary, political, social, and artistic forms of creative expression. These forms include, but are not limited to, visual arts, dance, drama, music, film, and poetry. Courses blend an atmosphere of sensory discovery, performance, analysis, inquiry, and collaboration. Courses employ inquiry-based methodologies, cultural immersion, and collaboration as they elevate conceptual knowledge.

IDS 2302
Freudian Dreams
3 hours
Spring

This course provides an introduction to dreams and psychoanalytic theory through a study of Sigmund Freud's influential book: The Interpretation of Dreams. The history of thought surrounding dreams, the creative process of dreaming and the transformation of thoughts and words into images, as well as the psychoanalytic interpretations of the social, sexual, and cultural meanings to be found in dreams will be examined and explored. Students will also be introduced to the idea of Freud as critique, as well as to some critiques of Freud's approach to dreams.

WGC 2300-2399
Tangents
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An experiential, interdisciplinary study in the humanities and/or social sciences of the historical, social, literary, cultural, and/or aesthetic perspectives of specific topics. Course content and topics will vary. (WRITING; SPEAKING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES/SOCIAL SCIENCES)

WGC 3300-3399
Junior Seminar
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An experiential, interdisciplinary study in the humanities and/or social sciences or natural sciences of the historical, social, literary, cultural, aesthetic, and systems analysis perspectives of specific topics. Course content and topics will vary. (WRITING; SPEAKING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES/SOCIAL SCIENCES)

Cultivating Creative Expression

In this theme, students could explore the creative process and the connection it has with cognitive, psychological, emotional, bodily/kinesthetic, aesthetic, and social development.

ART 2022 (FA)
Cultivating Creative Expression through Visual Art
3 hours
Fall, Spring

Students will create works of visual art in various media, reflecting on the creative process, the influence of culture, and the dynamic and reciprocal interactions among the artist, instructor, and student. Lecture and studio four hours.

MUS 2022 (FA)
Cultivating Creative Expression Through Music
3 hours
Fall, Spring

Students will create works of music using various media, reflecting on the creative process, the influence of culture, and the dynamic and reciprocal interactions among the artist, instructor, and student. Lecture/studio three hours.

THR 2022 (FA)
Cultivating Creative Expression Through Theatre
3 hours
Spring

The emphasis in this course is on understanding and creating theatre as a springboard for more deeply understanding and developing personal creativity. Students will be immersed in an integrated approach to developing theatre artistry through watching, reading and analyzing plays; engaging in the creative process of playmaking and playwriting; and participating in the collaborative process of theatre production. No prior theatre skills necessary. Lecture and studio lab.

Empire, Colonialism, and Globalization

The formation, growth and power of empires, their colonial regimes (driven to the far reaches of their worlds by appetites for wealth, resources, and human labor), and globalization are intimately linked. Courses in this theme could include prehistoric, ancient and/or modern empires, the hegemony exercised through far reaching colonial practices, and post-colonial consequences in globalization.

ART 2130 (FA)
Art from 1400 to the Present
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A global survey of art history from 1400 to the present examining the later artistic traditions of Europe, Asia, Africa, Oceania and the Americas. The course focuses on visual art and art making in light of changing social, political, religious, and cultural circumstances. Lecture three hours. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

Expressions of Belief

Many performances and works of art and literature express the deeply held beliefs of their creators. Courses in this theme could examine the aesthetic properties of various works and forms that express religious, social, political, and/or personal convictions.

ANT 2300
Meso American Cultures
3 hours
Spring

Introduction to the cultures and peoples of Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, and Honduras. Readings and lectures will focus on language, art, and political economy as vehicles for the expression of beliefs.

COM 3315
Political Communication
3 hours
On Demand

Examines the theoretical and practical aspects of political communication. Topics covered include political debates, speechwriting, political cartoons, communication strategies during and after campaigns, and the role of the media in political communication. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY)

REL 2010 (LS)
Biblical Literature: The Hebrew Scriptures
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An analysis of Old Testament literature as the product of the life of the Hebrew people, students will have the opportunity to examine selected documents in terms of their literary structure, historical context, and religious perspective. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

REL 2020 (LS)
Biblical Literature: The New Testament
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An analysis of early Christian literature as the product of the lives of the first followers of Jesus Christ. Students will have the opportunity to examine selected documents in terms of their literary structure, audience, historical context, religious perspective, and their relation to the broader Christian community and Western culture. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

How We Tell Stories

What does it mean to tell stories? Why are stories so important to us? How do different media present stories? And what happens when artists, writers and filmmakers shift away from narrative and try to do something other than tell a story? The courses in this theme will explore these questions.

C I/ITC 2010
Narrative, New Media, and Gaming
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course addresses the ways in which we tell stories in the digital age. Through exploring storytelling in social media, mobile contexts, and gaming, students in this course will experience a range of different narratives in many types of digital media, such as interactive online stories, podcasts, and video games. We examine forms of digital storytelling within media, marketing, and education, with opportunities for students to research, participate within, and to create original narratives as they share their own stories in a variety of media.

ENG 2170
Introduction to Film
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A critical examination of notable examples of the filmmaker's art from silent movies up to the modern era, including a variety of film genres and including both American and foreign films. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

IDS 3210
Exploring the Documentary Form
3 hours
On Demand

The course offers students a chance to learn the fundamentals of non-fiction story telling. Students will research a topic, and then develop a video, audio, or photographic documentary that uses their research to tell a compelling story. During this course, students will learn a range of techniques that bridge academic disciplines: how to use both primary and secondary sources for research, writing skills to structure their documentaries, visual communication techniques to translate their writing into images, and editing skills to clearly communicate their story.

LLC 2025 (LS)
Literature in Translation
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of various literatures in translation, from the medieval through the modern period, focusing on the language and culture areas featured in departmental offerings. Course content will vary and may concentrate on poetry, fiction, drama, or a combination. (MULTI CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

PHL 1502
Everyday Philosophy: Aesthetic Perspectives
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to special problems, topics, or issues in philosophy from aesthetic perspectives. The subject matter of this course will vary. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

REL 2020 (LS)
Biblical Literature: The New Testament
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An analysis of early Christian literature as the product of the lives of the first followers of Jesus Christ. Students will have the opportunity to examine selected documents in terms of their literary structure, audience, historical context, religious perspective, and their relation to the broader Christian community and Western culture. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

THR 2005 (FA)
Page and Stage
3 hours
Fall

In this class, students will have the opportunity to learn techniques for analyzing and interpreting written dramatic texts and theatrical performances. They will analyze and interpret plays of different styles from various historical periods, with particular attention to the unique characteristics of drama as a medium for telling stories.

THR 2610 (FA)
Oral Interpretation
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to the study of literature through the medium of performance. The student is expected to master techniques of literary selection and analysis and to perform from poetry, prose and dramatic literature.

Identity, Culture and Media

Whether hand crafted, machine made, digital or internet based, media of all sorts make up a vital dimension of global culture. Courses in this theme could examine how the folk arts, the fine arts and/or the mass media shape global discourse and personal identity.

COM 3531
Mass Media & Society
On Demand
ENG 2170
Introduction to Film
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A critical examination of notable examples of the filmmaker's art from silent movies up to the modern era, including a variety of film genres and including both American and foreign films. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

Revolutions And Social Change

This theme examines the critical role of political, social, and cultural revolutions in bringing change to human society. Emphasis is on the origins and effects of revolutions over time.

SOC 1100
Social Problems in American Society
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A survey course which examines the major social problems in America today, such as poverty, racism, sexism, aging, militarism and war, environmental abuse, crime, mental illness, drug abuse and alcoholism. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

Shaping the Human Environment

As human beings, we constantly shape and reshape our environment; in doing so we shape and reshape our relationship to the aesthetics of that environment. Courses in this theme could explore the relationship of design choices to varied aesthetic systems and media, how humans produce meaning through interaction with designed artifacts, and ways that design can be used for understanding and improving the human condition.

COM 3531
Mass Media & Society
On Demand
FCS 1000
Apparel and Consumer Behavior
3 hours
Fall

An introductory study of the nature and importance of life styles; communication, economics, psychology, sociology, design and concepts of manufacturing, marketing and retailing as factors which influence consumer acceptance and utilization of fashions.
Lecture three hours.

IND 2012
Product Design
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This is an introduction to product design and problem-solving techniques. Emphasis is given to history of industrial design, methods for communicating design ideas, systematic design, product design specifications, corporate strategies in planning product innovations, fundamentals of materials and manufacturing processes used in the mass production of consumer products. Students will write multiple reports and give oral presentations throughout the semester. Selected assignments from this course will be appropriate for inclusion in student portfolios. Lecture three hours. (WRITING; SPEAKING)

Social Change Through the Arts

How do artists respond to the world around them? In this theme, students could explore how they might use the performing and visual arts as a response to current social problems and their related cultural, interpersonal, and personal concerns.

ART 2019 (FA)
Art for Social Change
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course combines an introductory studio course with an examination of the way in which art can contribute to social change. Studio assignments will involve students in the investigation, understanding and application of artistic methods and the principles of design while thematically exploring contemporary social issues. Lectures, class discussions and project critiques are geared to develop students' awareness of how art can address social issues. Lecture and studio four hours.

MUS 2613 (FA)
Survey of Western Music
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A survey of Western music from the Renaissance through the 20th century. Emphasis is placed on style and form of music as perceived by the listener. Lecture three hours. (CORE: HUMANITIES/MUSIC MAJORS ONLY)

SOC 1100
Social Problems in American Society
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A survey course which examines the major social problems in America today, such as poverty, racism, sexism, aging, militarism and war, environmental abuse, crime, mental illness, drug abuse and alcoholism. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

THR 2017 (FA)
Theatre for Social Change
3 hours
Spring

This course is a practical and seminar class focused on the history and theory behind "theatre for social change" and is grounded in participation, research, analysis, and performance. Students study and apply various theories and methodologies of theatre for social change (image, forum, playback, invisible theatre, etc.) to effect change related to social, economic, cultural, political, and interpersonal issues.

The Body: Expression, Presentation And Representation

The body is source, vehicle, and often subject of creative expression. Courses in this theme could explore expression, presentation, and representation of the body as well as concepts of gender and the articulate self.

DAN 3430 (FA)
Dance History
3 hours
Fall, Spring

The study of the history of dance from the earliest times to the present. The course will focus on dance in relation to other art forms as well as on the cultural, aesthetic and philosophical influences on dance. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

DAN 3435 (FA)
Dance History in the Modern Era
3 hours
Spring

A Contemporary Dance History will explore concert dance styles from the 20th century to the present day. Special emphasis will be given to cultural, aesthetic and philosophical influences on contemporary concert dance.

IDS 2210 (FA)
Bodies, Places, Spaces, Times, and Things
3 hours
On Demand

Inquiring into the ways in which humans create, transmit and transform meaning materially, this course investigates the physical dimensions of human being - bodies (our own and others'), places, spaces, times, and things - exploring how dimensions of physical existence common to the human species bear variable meanings across personal and cultural boundaries. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSSDISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES or SOCIAL SCIENCES)

THR 3640 (FA)
Solo and Group Performance
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to performance studies, using the principles of oral interpretation. The course begins with the training of the body, voice, and sense memory as well as an introduction to dramatic analysis. The second part of the course uses these performance instruments for solo rehearsal and presentation of student selected literary texts: description, narrative, drama and poetry. The course concludes with ensemble performances of literary texts. (SPEAKING) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

Traditions and Innovations

This theme would introduce students to traditions and innovations in forms of creative expression since approximately 1500. In the courses, students would be able to interpret those forms through various theoretical frameworks. In particular, students would understand how those forms change over time, both reflecting and shaping their social, religious, political, and intellectual contexts.

ART 2130 (FA)
Art from 1400 to the Present
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A global survey of art history from 1400 to the present examining the later artistic traditions of Europe, Asia, Africa, Oceania and the Americas. The course focuses on visual art and art making in light of changing social, political, religious, and cultural circumstances. Lecture three hours. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

ENG 2050 (LS)
Studies in British Literature
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of major works of British Literature. Course content will vary and may concentrate on poetry, fiction, drama, or a combination. Prerequisite: ENG 1000.

HIS 1110 (HS)
History and Culture
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An examination of selected themes in world or regional history with an emphasis on how products of creative expression have shaped, and been shaped by, their historical context. NOTE: HIS 1110 DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A HISTORY MAJOR OR MINOR. (MULTICULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

MUS 2611 (HS)
Music History and Style I
2 hours
Fall

An overview of the stylistic tendencies throughout Western music history and an examination of the development of Western notated music and musical style as revealed through studies of social influences, biographical figures, and notated musical scores from ancient times to the mid-seventeenth century. (MULTI -CULT URAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY ) (CORE: HUMANITIES/MUSIC MAJORS ONLY)

MUS 2612 (HS)
Music History and Style II
2 hours
Spring

An examination of the development of Western notated music and musical style as revealed through studies of social influences,
biographical figures, and notated musical scores from the mid-seventeenth century to the mid-nineteenth century. (WRITING; MULTICULT
URAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY ) (CORE: HUMANITIES/MUSIC MAJORS ONLY )

MUS 3611 (HS)
Music History and Style III
2 hours
Fall

GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID)
An examination of the development of Western notated music and musical style as revealed through studies of social influences,
biographical figures, and notated musical scores from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL;
CROSS-DISCIPLINARY ) (CORE: HUMANITIES/MUSIC MAJORS ONLY )

PHL 2013
Philosophy of Art
3 hours
Fall

A course that concentrates on the interplay of art and philosophy in ancient through contemporary cultures. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

Historical & Social - 6 or 9 hours

Ancient Worlds

This theme explores a diverse range of prehistoric, ancient, and pre-modern peoples, the history and culture of such societies, and the methods and evidence used to study them.

ANT 1420
Archaeology and the Human Past
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to the human past through the scientific process of archaeology. Controversial issues discussed may include human evolution, the fate of the Neandertals, peopling of the Americas, and the cycling of state level societies. Ultimately, lessons from the past are considered in light of contemporary human issues. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

ART 2030 (FA)
Art from Prehistory to 1400
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A global survey of art history focusing on the early visual artistic traditions of Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas from the dawn of art to 1400. The course examines visual art and art making in religious, social, cultural, and political contexts. Lecture three hours. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

HIS 2312 (HS)
Introduction to the Ancient Mediterranean World
3 hours
Fall, Even-Numbered Years

A survey of the Ancient Mediterranean, including Greece, the Hellenistic World, and Rome. Topics covered will include ancient art, philosophy, religion, and literature. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

REL 2010 (LS)
Biblical Literature: The Hebrew Scriptures
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An analysis of Old Testament literature as the product of the life of the Hebrew people, students will have the opportunity to examine selected documents in terms of their literary structure, historical context, and religious perspective. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

Appalachia: Life, Culture, and Land

This theme examines the natural environment, culture, society, and human identity in the Appalachian region with an eye toward understanding its unique qualities as well as its place within the nation and larger world.

AS 2200 (LS)
Appalachian Stories
3 hours
Fall

Introduction to the literature of Appalachia with an emphasis on the multiplicity of narrative forms in the region. This course examines both historical and contemporary Appalachian literary expression as well as local, regional, national, and international perspectives on the literature of the region. Students read and study oral narratives, exploration narratives, travel writing, memoir, autobiography, song lyrics, and nature writing, in addition to fiction, poetry, and drama. The course also explores how literary production comments on and participates in the construction of Appalachia.

AS 2411
Appalachia: An Introduction (Social Sciences)
3 hours
On Demand

This course explores the Appalachian region from a cross-disciplinary perspective, with readings on Appalachia drawn primarily from the social sciences. Both historical and contemporary issues are examined, focusing upon national and international as well as local and regional contexts. This courses provides an introduction to the Bachelor of Arts degree in Appalachian Studies and to the undergraduate minor in Appalachian Studies. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

AS/GLY 2301
The History of Coal from the Pennsylvanian to the Present
3 hours
Spring

Coal has played a critical role in the history of the southern Appalachians. The geologic processes that formed coal and shaped the landscape into the steep ridges and hollows of the Appalachian coalfields have directly affected the human history of the region – from hunting in pre-colonial times, to settlement and subsistence farming in the 1800s, to mining and unionization in the 1900s, to mountaintop removal and natural gas/coalbed methane extraction in the last decade. This course covers the physical and chemical processes that form coal as well as the tectonic and geomorphologic processes that formed the landscape of the coalfields and shaped the agricultural practices of the early settlers. It examines the cultural history of coal mining and life in the company-owned coal camps and the political history of unionization through literature and film. The economics and environmental consequences of coal-fired power plants are discussed, and the environmental and occupational hazards associated with both underground and surface coal mining are analyzed from both a scientific and a sociological perspective. (Same as AS 2301.)

AS/MUS 2016 (FA)
Appalachian Music
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A survey of Appalachian music including both instrumental and vocal styles, older traditions and newer regional forms. Students will have opportunities to develop musical skills through hands-on class projects and activities. Lecture three hours. (Same as AS 2016.) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

COM 3118
Communicating Coal in Appalachia
3 hours
On Demand

The course examines the types of communication and information campaigns used by various stakeholders in the cultural, economic and political conflicts surrounding the coal industry in Appalachia. Students will learn through case studies, readings, guest speakers and at least one field trip to the coal fields of Appalachia.

HIS 3726 (HS)
History of the Appalachian Region
3 hours
Spring

GEN ED: Historical Studies Designation; Historical and Social Perspective (Theme: "Appalachia") A survey of the history of the Appalachian region from the period of exploration and settlement to the present. (WRITING)

SOC 3710
Sociology of Appalachian Communities
3 hours
Spring

This course examines Appalachian communities from a sociological perspective, with a focus on how the region gives rise to a unique configuration of cultural, institutional, and other social practices. Specific attention is also given to the differences between urban and rural Appalachian communities, as well as the complex relationships Appalachia has with the broader component of American society.

Capitalism and Its Critics

Capitalism had its critics before it even had a name. Yet capitalism has endured. And so has the criticism. While each course will provide its own unique perspective and areas of emphasis, all courses will address economics and economic systems; articulate the essential principles of free market capitalism; assess the underlying assumptions, constraints, and known limitations of market-based systems; and examine issues of market failure and theories of government regulation of markets.

ECO 2030
Principles of Economics - Price Theory
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A brief introduction to the study of economics followed by an in-depth analysis of microeconomics, including: the price mechanism and supply and demand analysis; consumer choice; cost and revenue analysis of the firm; market structures; factor markets and income distribution; market failure and the role of government; and current economic problems such as pollution, poverty and discrimination. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

FIN 2860
Personal Finance
3 hours
On Demand

A study of the key concepts, tools, and techniques of personal financial management. Focus is placed on the financial statements of the individual. The balance sheet model includes a discussion of personal assets - both financial and non- financial, personal liabilities including all types of loans, and personal net worth. The implications of the current financial environment (i.e., changing tax laws, savings instruments, interest rates, etc.) is also considered from the standpoint of the individual.

HIS 3524
World Economy: History and Theory
3 hours
Fall, Even-Numbered Years

This course traces the development of the world economy to the present, focusing on the search for the determinants of economic success and the various solutions that have been offered. The long term changes in world income and population are quantified (mainly for the second millennium), the forces that explain the success of rich countries are identified, and the obstacles that hindered economic advance in lagging regions are explored. We will emphasize the interaction between empirical methods and interdisciplinary theories. The interaction between wealthy nations and the rest of the world is scrutinized to assess the degree to which backwardness may have been due to Western policy. Also, special emphasis will be placed on the analysis of government spending patterns and the economic impact of conflicts.

MGT 3040
Child Labor in Global and Historical Perspectives
3 hours
Spring

Child labor is a complex social and economic problem in the less-developed nations of the world today. Yet, we know of no industrially advanced nation that did not go through its own "dirty phase" of pervasive use of child labor. This course examines child labor from both historical and contemporary global perspectives.

PS 3410
Marxism
3 hours
On Demand

Explores the basic principles and features found within Marxist thought. This includes some discussions of Marx's immediate predecessors such as Hegel and Feuerbach in post-Marxist socialist and communist literature. (MULTI -CULT URAL; CROSS DISCIPLINARY )

Cultural Diversity

Examines the nature of culture and the diverse ways in which societies make meaning and are organized across time and space. Topics include cultural and religious values and beliefs, modern historical influences on cultural variation, and the impact of gender, ethnicity, and inequality on the cultural experience.

ANT 1415
Understanding Culture
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course explores the diversity and unity of human experience through the lens of cultural anthropology. Using case studies and other texts, students will gain familiarity with different cultural worlds. As they do so, they will be asked to think critically about their own cultural ideas and actions, to reflect on problems facing humanity in the contemporary world, and to understand the various ways in which they are historically and socially connected to other people in other places. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

ART 2011 (FA)
Introduction to Visual Arts
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course covers selected historical and contemporary issues, the formal structure and critical analysis of the visual arts and an examination of art's relationship to ideas, beliefs and culture. Students will develop a critical understanding of art as a manifestation of broader social, historical, and contemporary issues in a global context. Lecture three hours. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

GHY 1040
Introduction to Human Geography
3 hours
Fall

This course examines the spatial patterns of human society. By focusing on the description and analysis of the spatial dimensions of human language, economy, religion and government, this course is a celebration of human diversity. Lectures, readings, films, slides, writing exercises, map quizzes and class discussions will help the student to understand and appreciate the geography of the human mosaic. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

HIS 1120 (HS)
Society and History
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An examination of selected themes in world or regional history with an emphasis on the historical context of various social, political, cultural, and economic processes. NOTE: HIS 1120 DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A HISTORY MAJOR OR MINOR. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

MUS 2023 (FA)
Music and Gender
3 hours
Spring

An investigation of the social constructions of gender and how they are reflected in music. Topics will include how gender constructions operate in compositional, performance and teaching practices.

REL 1110
Religions of the World
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course introduces the major living religions of the world. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

SOC 4560
Race and Minority Relations
3 hours
Fall

GEN ED: Historical and Social Perspective (Theme: "Cultural Diversity") Examination of intergroup relations, including racial, ethnic, and women's issues; the bases of conflict, accommodation, and assimilation; the nature and consequences of prejudice and discrimination; evaluation of proposals for reduction or elimination of prejudice and discrimination. (MULTI-CULTURAL) [Dual-listed with SOC 5560.]

WS 2421
Sex, Gender, and Power: Introduction to Women's Studies for the Social Sciences
3 hours
Fall

This course will provide an introduction to the study of gender and a diversity of women, both historic and contemporary, using a variety of methodologies and materials drawn primarily from the social sciences. It will also serve as an introduction to the interdisciplinary discipline of Women's Studies for the major and the minor in Women's Studies. Students who take WS 2421 cannot take WS 2420 for credit. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

Empire, Colonialism, and Globalization

The formation, growth and power of empires, their colonial regimes (driven to the far reaches of their worlds by appetites for wealth, resources, and human labor), and globalization are intimately linked. Courses in this theme could include prehistoric, ancient and/or modern empires, the hegemony exercised through far reaching colonial practices, and post-colonial consequences in globalization.

ANT 1415
Understanding Culture
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course explores the diversity and unity of human experience through the lens of cultural anthropology. Using case studies and other texts, students will gain familiarity with different cultural worlds. As they do so, they will be asked to think critically about their own cultural ideas and actions, to reflect on problems facing humanity in the contemporary world, and to understand the various ways in which they are historically and socially connected to other people in other places. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

Expressions of Belief

Many performances and works of art and literature express the deeply held beliefs of their creators. Courses in this theme could examine the aesthetic properties of various works and forms that express religious, social, political, and/or personal convictions.

REL 2010 (LS)
Biblical Literature: The Hebrew Scriptures
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An analysis of Old Testament literature as the product of the life of the Hebrew people, students will have the opportunity to examine selected documents in terms of their literary structure, historical context, and religious perspective. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

Identity, Culture and Media

Whether hand crafted, machine made, digital or internet based, media of all sorts make up a vital dimension of global culture. Courses in this theme could examine how the folk arts, the fine arts and/or the mass media shape global discourse and personal identity.

ART 2011 (FA)
Introduction to Visual Arts
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course covers selected historical and contemporary issues, the formal structure and critical analysis of the visual arts and an examination of art's relationship to ideas, beliefs and culture. Students will develop a critical understanding of art as a manifestation of broader social, historical, and contemporary issues in a global context. Lecture three hours. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

Individual and Society

Focuses on relationships between the individual and society; examines both the biological and cognitive foundations of individual behavior and the cultural forces that influence personal experience. Emphasis is on how individuals simultaneously shape and are shaped by diverse group, organizational, and social contexts.

ANT 2420
Gender, Race and Class
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An anthropological study of gender, social class, ethnicity, race and sexuality as cultural categories with a variety of meanings. Systems of inequality and the ways in which these categories are used to limit access to economic wealth, power, and prestige are analyzed in a global context. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

ENG 2120 (LS)
African-American Literature
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A critical study of the work of outstanding African-American writers. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE:HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

FCS 2111
Social History of the Family
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course will examine family as an institution through cross-cultural, social, and historical contexts. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an introduction to theoretical perspectives used in the study of families, knowledge of the history of family life, and learning experiences that provide opportunities to think critically, communicate intelligently, and make informed opinions about contemporary family issues. Connections to other courses within the individual and society theme will focus on individual and group decision making within the context of the family. Lecture three hours.

PHL 2000
Philosophy, Society, and Ethics
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to ethical reasoning and an examination of moral problems in contemporary social issues. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

PSY 1200
Psychology: Historical, Social, and Scientific Foundations
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course will focus on the biological and cognitive foundations of individual behavior, as well as the individual in the social context. Research on psychological phenomena will be reviewed to demonstrate the logic of the scientific method, to foster critical thinking, to identify potential shortcomings in interpretations of behavior (e.g., claims presented in the popular media), and to describe linkages to everyday experiences (e.g., aesthetic and perceptual judgments, improved studying, friendship and attraction, and development of political attitudes). Students will have the opportunity to learn how to use empirical data to draw sound conclusions about behavior. Finally, connections to other thematic areas of scholarly inquiry within other disciplines will be presented. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

RM 2100
Leisure in Society
3 hours

This course focuses on relationships between the individual and society in the context of leisure. It examines both the biological and cognitive foundations of individual leisure behavior and the cultural forces that influence personal experience. Emphasis is on how an individual's leisure simultaneously shapes and is shaped by diverse group, organizational and social contexts.

SOC 1000
The Sociological Perspective
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course applies the sociological perspective to the experience of individuals within differing social contexts, ranging from interpersonal interactions and small groups to larger organizations and the broader society. Relationships between individuals and their societies are examined with respect to a variety of issues, including socialization processes and cultural diversity; the nature of gender, racial, and other social identities; and institutional settings ranging from the family to the economy and government. Required for majors and minors. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

WS 2400
Distinguished Lectures on Women, Sex, and Gender
3 hours
On Demand

This course introduces students to a variety of topics and methods of investigation in the study of women's and gender issues. Featuring a variety of lectures from multiple disciplines, this course stresses the importance of taking women and gender seriously for understanding a variety of topics. Students will also interpret and analyze the lectures through regular meetings with an instructor, who also designs assignments and readings around each lecture topic. (MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY)

Mind

Explores theoretical questions concerning the nature of the mind, knowledge, and mental phenomena. Examines the nature of knowledge, creativity, the concept of "truth," as well as theories of the mind from biological, philosophical, anthropological, perceptual, social, developmental and experimental perspectives. Considers the social, cultural, theoretical, and political pressures that contribute to our understanding of the mind.

HIS 3923 (HS)
The Truth in History and the Truth of History
3 hours
On Demand

The primary goal of this course is to help students understand how historians determine the truth in history. The class will use the example of a specific historical event. Students will examine reasoned arguments about truth, relevant social theories necessary for understanding social processes, and primary and secondary sources about the event in question. The class will integrate these materials to explore how historians determine the truth in history and the truth of history.

IDS 3260
Creativity: An Introduction
3 hours
On Demand

An interdisciplinary and cross-cultural investigation of creativity as an individual, social, cultural, and natural phenomenon. Although often associated with artistry, creativity contributes to the development of all academic and professional disciplines and is an important component in non-academic culture and in individual life. The concept of creativity has deep roots in Western culture (going back at least to Augustine), and the cross disciplinary study of creativity has burgeoned in the United States since WWII. The class will explore: the history of the concept of creativity; creativity and self-fulfillment; psychological, anthropological, and sociological theories of creativity; practices claiming to enhance creativity; and case studies of creative individuals and creative breakthroughs.

LLC 2050 (formerly FL 2050)
Say What? Language in Mind and Society
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An exploration of the issues surrounding human language and its relationship with thought, cognition and culture. Students will have the opportunity to learn how the sounds, structures and meanings of human languages are produced and interpreted, and will explore variation among world languages as well as the relationship among language, society, and culture. Different theoretical approaches to these issues will be explained. The course will also examine the interaction between language and mind and the neurological basis of human language, and will look at the application of linguistic principles in language learning and artificial intelligence.

PHL 1501
Everyday Philosophy: Historical and Social Perspectives
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to special problems, topics, or issues in philosophy from historical and social perspectives. The subject matter of this course will vary. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

PSY 1200
Psychology: Historical, Social, and Scientific Foundations
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course will focus on the biological and cognitive foundations of individual behavior, as well as the individual in the social context. Research on psychological phenomena will be reviewed to demonstrate the logic of the scientific method, to foster critical thinking, to identify potential shortcomings in interpretations of behavior (e.g., claims presented in the popular media), and to describe linkages to everyday experiences (e.g., aesthetic and perceptual judgments, improved studying, friendship and attraction, and development of political attitudes). Students will have the opportunity to learn how to use empirical data to draw sound conclusions about behavior. Finally, connections to other thematic areas of scholarly inquiry within other disciplines will be presented. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

Religion, Myth and Society

This theme explores relationships between people and their belief systems, including the ways in which humans have employed such beliefs to give meaning to their world. Emphasis is on diversity and the many varieties of faith and belief.

ANT 2430
Magic, Witchcraft and Religion
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A cross-cultural study of the nature and functions of belief systems. Emphasis is placed on understanding the belief systems of non-Western cultures in order to provide a means through which our own beliefs can be better understood. A variety of anthropological and psychological approaches to the study of belief systems are utilized. (MULTI-CULTURAL)

ART 2030 (FA)
Art from Prehistory to 1400
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A global survey of art history focusing on the early visual artistic traditions of Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas from the dawn of art to 1400. The course examines visual art and art making in religious, social, cultural, and political contexts. Lecture three hours. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

IDS 3261
Sustainability, Religion, Spirituality
3 hours
On Demand

Debate has raged among scholars, activists, and members of religious communities about the role(s) of religion and of specific religions in fostering unsustainability and in achieving sustainability. As part of this debate, some have proposed the existence and importance of a spirituality unconnected with historical or new religions as a key component of moving toward sustainability. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to these questions both in their historical and contemporary forms.

REL 1110
Religions of the World
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course introduces the major living religions of the world. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

THR 3730
Early Theatre History and Literature
3 hours
Fall

This course explores the history, literature, and criticism of the theatre from prehistory up to the Early Modern period. The course will focus predominantly on European theatre, but will also include studies of some Asian forms. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

WGC 3301 (FA)
Junior Seminar: Natives of the Southwest: A Walk in Beauty
3 hours
Fall, Spring

Revolutions And Social Change

This theme examines the critical role of political, social, and cultural revolutions in bringing change to human society. Emphasis is on the origins and effects of revolutions over time.

COM 3532
Integrated Communication
On Demand
HIS 1501 (HS)
Revolution and Social Change in World History
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course provides an analysis of significant revolutions and social movements in world history. These may be defined as political, social, cultural, scientific and technological. This course examines the events of these movements, as well as the philosophical/ideological ideas that shaped them. It also examines how these revolutions affected societies in a local and global context, and how they continue to affect the world in which we live today. NOTE: HIS 1501 DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A HISTORY MAJOR OR MINOR. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

IDS 2200 (HS)
Race and Resistance: Perspectives on African Americans in the Jim Crow South
3 hours
Spring

Race remains one of America's central organizing principles. This course will explore how African Americans in the South, following the Civil War, struggled against white supremacy in their politics and in their culture, in the process creating perhaps our nation's most successful non-violent campaign for social change, the Civil Rights Movement. To do this, we will explore the African American experience from a variety of disciplinary perspectives: scholars from different disciplines, students will come to understand, can approach the past very differently. Students will also become acquainted with popular aspects of African American culture, such as jazz, blues, dance, religion and food. During the course of the semester, students will design their own research projects, integrating knowledge drawn from a variety of disciplinary approaches and methods, presenting their research in both written form and other media.

MUS 2015 (FA)
History of Rock Music
3 hours
Fall, Spring

Study of musical groups, soloists and styles related to the evolution of this genre, and on related social, historic and political events. Rock music from the early 1950s through significant developments of the late 1970s. Lecture three hours. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

PHL 3030
Feminist Philosophy
3 hours
Spring

This course examines conceptual and normative issues in contemporary feminist theory. Issues to be discussed include power and the production of knowledge, resistance, violence against women, sex and gender, the interrelatedness of gender, race, class, and sexuality, body image, the personal as political, and the relation between feminist theory and activism. The class also considers western and non-western feminist discussion of these themes. The goal is for each student to gain an appreciation of the diversity and complexity of feminist thought, as well as insight concerning the relation between women's experiences and feminist theorizing. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL)

REL 2120
Christianity
3 hours
Spring

An exploration of Christianity from the early period through the Enlightenment and rise of contemporary Christian movements, students will explore the history of the church, its doctrinal emphases, and its practice in a variety of locations and time periods. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

SOC 1100
Social Problems in American Society
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A survey course which examines the major social problems in America today, such as poverty, racism, sexism, aging, militarism and war, environmental abuse, crime, mental illness, drug abuse and alcoholism. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

Social Change Through the Arts

How do artists respond to the world around them? In this theme, students could explore how they might use the performing and visual arts as a response to current social problems and their related cultural, interpersonal, and personal concerns.

SOC 1100
Social Problems in American Society
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A survey course which examines the major social problems in America today, such as poverty, racism, sexism, aging, militarism and war, environmental abuse, crime, mental illness, drug abuse and alcoholism. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

This American Life

With a focus on the foundations of civic education, this theme leads to an understanding of how the American people created and developed their democratic institutions and social processes; how marginalized groups within the American framework have sought and won access to civic life; and how Americans have expressed their social and individual conscience to shape their identity and place within the world.

ECO 2030
Principles of Economics - Price Theory
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A brief introduction to the study of economics followed by an in-depth analysis of microeconomics, including: the price mechanism and supply and demand analysis; consumer choice; cost and revenue analysis of the firm; market structures; factor markets and income distribution; market failure and the role of government; and current economic problems such as pollution, poverty and discrimination. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

ENG 2350 (LS)
Studies in American Literature
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of major works of American literature. Course content will vary and may concentrate on poetry, fiction, drama, or a combination. Prerequisite: ENG 1000.

HIS 1200 (HS)
American History
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course will acquaint the student with the major developments of American history from pre-contact to post-modern eras. Emphasis will be given to the foundational political experiences of the American people and how political developments have been influenced and affected by social developments. Students will learn to apply analytical skills to the reading of primary texts representing the whole sweep of American history. Written expression will be emphasized. NOTE: HIS 1200 DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A HISTORY MAJOR OR MINOR. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

IDS 2000
This Grand Experiment: An Introduction to American Studies
3 hours
Fall

Since the 1930s, scholars have been studying the core values and ideas that define American (U.S.) culture. American Studies scholars integrate ideas and methods from a diverse array of disciplines in examining what it is that makes this place and its people "American." In this course, students will review the roots of American Studies and the concepts of exceptionalism, multiculturalism, and transnationalism, which have characterized how U.S. culture is perceived both here and abroad. Embedded in these concepts are physical, economic, political, and demographic characteristics that have historically and continue to define "America."

MUS 2014 (FA)
Jazz Music in American Society
3 hours
Fall, Spring

Jazz may be the United States' only original contribution to music. Due to its comparatively recent emergence as a recognized art form, a great deal of confusion exists as to the meaning, origins, development, and the place of jazz relative to other areas of music. This course will define jazz as precisely as possible and show its evolution in the historical background of the United States. Lecture three hours.

PS 1100
American National Government and Politics
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of the development and operation of the American national government, its powers, organization and policies. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

PS 3722
America in the World
3 hours
Spring

The course provides students with the foundation to understand the historical and contemporary practice of U.S. foreign policy and familiarizes them with patterns of continuity and change in U.S. foreign policy. (WRITING; SPEAKING)

SW 2020
The American Social Welfare System
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to social welfare as a concept and as a social institution: overview of the public and private network of social programs and services intended to help fulfill basic human needs. Analysis of major social issues, problems, and values which shape social policy and the distribution of resources in the U.S., with attention to several other nations. Visit to human service agency required. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

Understanding Culture Through Social Practice

WGC 2100-2199
Tangents
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An experiential, interdisciplinary study in the humanities and/or social sciences of the historical, social, literary, cultural, and/or aesthetic perspectives of specific topics. Course content and topics will vary. (WRITING; SPEAKING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES/SOCIAL SCIENCES)

WGC 3100-3199
Junior Seminar
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An experiential, interdisciplinary study in the humanities and/or social sciences or natural sciences of the historical, social, literary, cultural, aesthetic, and systems analysis perspectives of specific topics. Course content and topics will vary. (WRITING; SPEAKING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES/SOCIAL SCIENCES)

Local to Global - 6 or 9 hours

Cultural Diversity

Examines the nature of culture and the diverse ways in which societies make meaning and are organized across time and space. Topics include cultural and religious values and beliefs, modern historical influences on cultural variation, and the impact of gender, ethnicity, and inequality on the cultural experience.

ANT 1415
Understanding Culture
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course explores the diversity and unity of human experience through the lens of cultural anthropology. Using case studies and other texts, students will gain familiarity with different cultural worlds. As they do so, they will be asked to think critically about their own cultural ideas and actions, to reflect on problems facing humanity in the contemporary world, and to understand the various ways in which they are historically and socially connected to other people in other places. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

ART 2011 (FA)
Introduction to Visual Arts
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course covers selected historical and contemporary issues, the formal structure and critical analysis of the visual arts and an examination of art's relationship to ideas, beliefs and culture. Students will develop a critical understanding of art as a manifestation of broader social, historical, and contemporary issues in a global context. Lecture three hours. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

Democracy and Personal Life

Globalization is reshaping our lives. A strong but often overlooked consequence of the dramatic social changes brought about by globalization and democratization centers on personal life. The rise of modern global and democratic societies has fundamentally changed the contours of all human interactions—including romantic relationships, family structures, sexuality, emotions, religion, ethical decisions, use of technology, perceptions of risk, and lifestyle choices.

COM 2112
Online Public Discourse
3 hours
On Demand

Examination of the effects of Internet-based communication tools on issue awareness, formulation of perspectives, and exchange of views.

ENG 2130 (LS)
Ethnic American Literature
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of major ethnic American literature, with a particular focus on Latino American, Asian American, and/or American Indian writers.

PS 1200
Current Political Issues
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of the current political issues and problems facing the national government. Problems in such areas as labor, education, the economy, agriculture, equal rights, foreign relations and national security will be analyzed. Not open to students with credit for PS 1201.

SOC 1110
Sociology of Intimate Relationships
3 hours
Fall, Spring

Sociological perspectives and knowledge concerning intimate relationships, marriage, and family life in American society. General topics include marriage and marital relations; the family as a social institution; intimacy and love; sex, sexuality, and sexual relations; gender relations; singlehood; family dynamics; parenthood and child rearing; family crisis, conflict, and change; and marital separation, divorce, and remarriage.

SOC 1530
Selected Topics
On Demand
WS 2600
Introduction to LGBT Studies
3 hours
Fall

This course will provide a multi-disciplinary introduction to the study of historical, cultural, political and theoretical issues relevant to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals and communities and their allies.

Empire, Colonialism, and Globalization

The formation, growth and power of empires, their colonial regimes (driven to the far reaches of their worlds by appetites for wealth, resources, and human labor), and globalization are intimately linked. Courses in this theme could include prehistoric, ancient and/or modern empires, the hegemony exercised through far reaching colonial practices, and post-colonial consequences in globalization.

ANT 1415
Understanding Culture
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course explores the diversity and unity of human experience through the lens of cultural anthropology. Using case studies and other texts, students will gain familiarity with different cultural worlds. As they do so, they will be asked to think critically about their own cultural ideas and actions, to reflect on problems facing humanity in the contemporary world, and to understand the various ways in which they are historically and socially connected to other people in other places. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

ART 2130 (FA)
Art from 1400 to the Present
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A global survey of art history from 1400 to the present examining the later artistic traditions of Europe, Asia, Africa, Oceania and the Americas. The course focuses on visual art and art making in light of changing social, political, religious, and cultural circumstances. Lecture three hours. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

ENG 2040 (LS)
World Literature
3 hours
Spring

World literature from the seventeenth century to the present, read in English. (WRITING; MULTICULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

GLS 2000
Contemporary Global Issues
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course examines a selection of global issues from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. Students will be exposed to the complexities of these issues, which are the result of the confluence of historical, geographical, economic, cultural, and political factors. Emphasis will be placed on how different societies view global issues, as well as how different perspectives can alter one's understanding of them. (MULTICULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY)

HIS 1400 (HS)
World Empires
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course investigates how systems of power functioned on a global scale in the past. Students will discover, discuss, and write about how those systems came to be as well as what kind of society, culture, and world they have created. Students will also develop a clearer understanding not only of their individual role in such global interactions, but how events in one distant part of the world affect many other people around the globe. NOTE: HIS 1400 DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A HISTORY MAJOR OR MINOR. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

HIS/MSL 3823 (HS)
American Military History
3 hours
Fall

This course explores the American military experience from its origins in the colonial period to the present day. It is designed to view military history from a variety of angles, through multiple perspectives and formats, and to broaden students' views of the American military establishment. We will examine traditional military topics, such as strategy and tactics, and combat operations, as well as exploring "new military history" topics, such as the interaction between war and society, civil-military relations, and the social history of soldiers. We will also explore how political, social, and cultural factors have influenced the nature of warfare and the military institution in American history.

Global Resources

Basic requirements for human survival include food, water, shelter, and energy. These resources are globally distributed, and increasingly the acquisition of these commodities impacts, and indeed defines, local and international relationships, economically, environmentally, and politically. This theme explores geographical distributions of these resources, ways in which access to and use of resources shapes local and international relationships, technical systems that enable us to recover and use resources.

ECO 2620
Environmental and Resource Economics
3 hours
Fall

The course explores the efficient allocation of environmental and natural resources and examines the continuing conflict between economic activity and environmental quality and the conservation of natural resources. The course applies economic theory to local, regional, national, and international environmental issues.

GHY 1020
World Regional Geography
3 hours
Fall, Spring

The study of our contemporary world divided into the regions of North America, Central and South America, Africa, the Middle East, Europe, the Russian Realm, and South, East and Southeast Asia. Examination of global issues including population problems, technology and culture change, rural versus urban development, resource exportation and international trade, political identity and international conflict. (MULTICULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

IDS 3010
H2O: We are Water
3 hours
Fall, Spring

Water is studied in disciplines ranging from art to zoology. The hydrologic cycle functions on a global scale but has local impacts. This interdisciplinary course will look at water policy and how we manage water resources; who gets water, for what purpose; and the impacts of these decisions on the resource. It will discuss the ways we use water, abuse it, revere it, ignore it, and fight over it. In the US, our quality of life is entirely dependent on cheap, plentiful, clean water. We use it in vast quantities to produce power, grow food, and protect our health. Globally, demands for water continue to increase. The class will cover the intersections among our scientific understanding of water flows, our technological developments, and our policy approaches toward this elemental resource, locally and globally.

NUT 2351
Global Nutrition: Emerging Health Challenges
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course will examine global nutritional issues as they pertain to health and incidence of disease, integrating social, biological, political, economic, and environmental factors. The relationship of nutrition and global health to diverse aspects of globalization and economic development will be explored. Specific issues include hunger and obesity, infant mortality and elder health, nutritional programs and agencies, local to global food markets, and meat versus plant food sources. Students will gain the ability to accurately evaluate the food and health issues of a specific country or region. Lecture three hours.

TEC 2601 (formerly TEC 3601)
Energy Issues and Technology
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course will explore the various forms of energy and will examine the complete range of energy alternatives existing in the world today. Students will examine energy resources and their economic and environmental impacts. Students will also have the opportunity to learn about the concepts, tools, techniques, and materials needed to design and construct systems that are used to produce energy. The course consists of three major sections: principles of power and energy, conventional energy resources, and renewable energy resources. Students will study how to measure energy resources and estimate the power that could be produced from them, as well as the technological options that exist for transforming these resources into useful sources of energy. Lecture three hours. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

How We Tell Stories

What does it mean to tell stories? Why are stories so important to us? How do different media present stories? And what happens when artists, writers and filmmakers shift away from narrative and try to do something other than tell a story? The courses in this theme will explore these questions.

ENG 2170
Introduction to Film
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A critical examination of notable examples of the filmmaker's art from silent movies up to the modern era, including a variety of film genres and including both American and foreign films. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

Identity, Culture and Media

Whether hand crafted, machine made, digital or internet based, media of all sorts make up a vital dimension of global culture. Courses in this theme could examine how the folk arts, the fine arts and/or the mass media shape global discourse and personal identity.

ART 2011 (FA)
Introduction to Visual Arts
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course covers selected historical and contemporary issues, the formal structure and critical analysis of the visual arts and an examination of art's relationship to ideas, beliefs and culture. Students will develop a critical understanding of art as a manifestation of broader social, historical, and contemporary issues in a global context. Lecture three hours. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

COM 3130
Minorities in Media
3 hours
On Demand

This lecture and discussion course introduces students to the complex relationships between race, gender, and popular culture via critical media analysis.

COM 3531
Mass Media & Society
On Demand
ENG 2170
Introduction to Film
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A critical examination of notable examples of the filmmaker's art from silent movies up to the modern era, including a variety of film genres and including both American and foreign films. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

MUS 2018 (FA)
Introduction to World Music
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A survey of musics representing international cultures. Emphasis is placed on the role of music in various life experiences. Lecture three hours. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

MUS 2615 (FA)
Music and Propaganda
3 hours
Spring, Alternate Years

This course is designed to examine ways in which music has historically been used internationally to enhance/intensify various aural and visual forms of propaganda. Although specific cases such as those in Nazi Germany, Communist China, and the Soviet Union are explored, the broader scope of the course also addresses the concepts of patriotism, promotion, protest, and manipulation.

MUS 2616 (FA)
Cuban Music and Culture
3 hours
Spring, Alternate Years

This course is designed to explore the music of Cuba as it has both reflected and shaped culture throughout Cuban history from the pre-Columbian era to the early twenty-first century. Of particular interest is the evolution of Cuban music during the twentieth century as it was appropriated and propagandized for economic and political purposes, as well as the development of Cuban music video accessible via the internet.

PHL 1503
Everyday Philosophy: Local to Global
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to special problems, topics, or issues in philosophy regarding cultural diversity and the interrelationship between the local and the global. The subject matter of this course will vary. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

REL 1100
Religion and Contemporary Issues
3 hours
Fall

This course examines the relationship between religion and the issues that confront our world. Through the exploration of writings of religious significance and other material and media artifacts (art, architecture, music, media, political rhetoric, film, etc.), the course considers how cultural and social influences shape religious expression and contribute to religion as a force in contemporary life both locally and globally.

Investigations: Global

An experiential, interdisciplinary study in the humanities and social sciences of significant global issues (historical, economic, social, cultural, ideological, aesthetic) and their relationships with local, regional, and national issues.

This course is available only to Watauga Global Community students.

WGC 1104
Investigations: Global
6 hours
Spring

Priority enrollment given to Watauga Global Community students.

An experiential, interdisciplinary study in the humanities and social sciences of significant global issues (historical, economic, social, cultural, ideological, aesthetic) and their relationships with local, regional, and national issues.

Origins and Migrations

Human prehistory/history is marked by the impacts of migrations. Whether compelled or drawn beyond their places of origin, migrants have challenged borders through conquest, colonialism, post-colonialism, exploitation, assimilation, and adaptation. As laborers, kin, refugees, and conquerors, they have spread technologies, ideologies, philosophies, and aesthetics.

ENG 2030 (LS)
World Literature
3 hours
Fall

World literature in translation from its beginnings to the seventeenth century. (WRITING; MULTICULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

FCS 2103
Family Development: Origins and Movement
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A study, using the multicultural life span approach, of factors affecting human and family development. Theories, patterns, structures and functions of diverse family groupings and interactions and interrelationships in family processes and development will be considered in relation to current research. Students will research their individual family origins and movement over time to understand the current change in ethnic diversity. Students will also study and analyze critical family issues and compare these issues within different cultures in the United States and around the world. Lecture three hours. (COMPUTER) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

GLS 2000
Contemporary Global Issues
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course examines a selection of global issues from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. Students will be exposed to the complexities of these issues, which are the result of the confluence of historical, geographical, economic, cultural, and political factors. Emphasis will be placed on how different societies view global issues, as well as how different perspectives can alter one's understanding of them. (MULTICULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY)

HIS 1600 (HS)
Migration in World History
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course examines the role of human migration in world history. Starting with "peopling the planet" and using topics such as language diversity, diaspora, colonization and immigration, students will explore the dispersal of people, plants, animals, diseases, as well as cultural and technological diffusion. The emphasis is on evaluation of primary and secondary sources, development of analytical skills, and application of methods used in comparative histories clustered around these themes. Students have a semester long project of preparing their own family history that entails using data bases, oral interviews, and narrative writing that puts their own "local" history into the "global" context of the main events of the past century. NOTE: HIS 1600 DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A HISTORY MAJOR OR MINOR. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

Performance of Culture

This theme explores the links between performance and culture through diverse perspectives and forms of expression. Culture and performance are learned and are reflexive, shaping and shaped by each other. Rituals, both public and private, enact culture and may take the form of performance. Public performances and performing arts enact culture in myriad forms, serving as cultural markers.

ARB/CHN/FRE/GER/JPN/POR/RSN/SNH 1050
Intermediate Language
3 hours
Spring

A continuation of CHN/FRE/GER/JPN/RSN/SNH 1040. Focus on various aspects of culture, society, literature, traditions, and daily preoccupations with continued development of communicative language skills. Reinforcement, expansion, and synthesis of concepts of language and culture through contact with authentic materials. Prerequisite: CHN/FRE/GER/JPN/RSN/SNH 1030 or CHN/FRE/GER/JPN/RSN/SNH 1040, or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

COM 3535
Intercultural Communication
On Demand
DAN 2020 (FA)
World Dance
3 hours
On Demand

This course will explore dance as a vital contribution to cultural understanding from various regions and cultures around the world including the Americas, Africa, Europe, Asia and Oceania.

DAN 2030 (FA)
Dance, Media and Culture
3 hours
On Demand

This course will focus on the intersection of dance, media and culture by contextualizing an emerging role of dance from an elitist perspective to a populist activity. Content will include a global perspective of dance on film, technological advances in digital dance media and the creation of fusion dance forms as a means of cultural expression.

FRE/GER/SNH 1060*
Accelerated Intermediate French/German/Spanish
6 hours
On Demand

Combines FRE/GER/SNH 1040 and FRE 1050. Prerequisite: FRE/GER/SNH 1020 or the equivalent. Class meets daily for a total of 300 minutes per week. Laboratory work required. (MULTI -CULT URAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

*6 s.h. classes, but only 3 s.h. count toward Gen Ed.

MUS 2018 (FA)
Introduction to World Music
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A survey of musics representing international cultures. Emphasis is placed on the role of music in various life experiences. Lecture three hours. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

THR 2020 (FA)
World Culture and Performance Studies
3 hours
On Demand

This course applies insights from performance art, theatre, dance and other art forms. Its interdisciplinary approach will allow students to have the opportunities to study the unique role of "performance" in various aspects of our society as well as the world today. The class will explore the concept of performance, and special attention will be paid to issues of multiculturalism and the cultural, political, historical, social, economic and technological contexts of performance studies.

Regions in Global Context

The region is a fundamental concept for understanding ideas and issues at a variety of scales from neighborhoods to counties to intergovernmental organizations and the global community. Criteria for defining a region can include physical or environmental conditions, cultural characteristics, political boundaries or connections between particular places. The Regions in a Global Context theme examines the interconnections between communities both near and far. Courses under this theme contribute to the global awareness of students and enable them to more fully participate in democratic institutions as informed and globally aware citizens.

ARB/CHN/FRE/GER/JPN/POR/RSN/SNH 1050
Intermediate Language
3 hours
Spring

A continuation of CHN/FRE/GER/JPN/RSN/SNH 1040. Focus on various aspects of culture, society, literature, traditions, and daily preoccupations with continued development of communicative language skills. Reinforcement, expansion, and synthesis of concepts of language and culture through contact with authentic materials. Prerequisite: CHN/FRE/GER/JPN/RSN/SNH 1030 or CHN/FRE/GER/JPN/RSN/SNH 1040, or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

ENG 2040 (LS)
World Literature
3 hours
Spring

World literature from the seventeenth century to the present, read in English. (WRITING; MULTICULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

FRE/GER/SNH 1060*
Accelerated Intermediate French/German/Spanish
6 hours
On Demand

Combines FRE/GER/SNH 1040 and FRE 1050. Prerequisite: FRE/GER/SNH 1020 or the equivalent. Class meets daily for a total of 300 minutes per week. Laboratory work required. (MULTI -CULT URAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

*6 s.h. classes, but only 3 s.h. count toward Gen Ed.

GHY 1020
World Regional Geography
3 hours
Fall, Spring

The study of our contemporary world divided into the regions of North America, Central and South America, Africa, the Middle East, Europe, the Russian Realm, and South, East and Southeast Asia. Examination of global issues including population problems, technology and culture change, rural versus urban development, resource exportation and international trade, political identity and international conflict. (MULTICULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

HIS 1130 (HS)
Themes in Global History
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An examination of selected themes in global history with an emphasis on the historical context of global issues, processes, trends, and systems as they have affected local regions. NOTE: HIS 1130 DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A HISTORY MAJOR OR MINOR. (MULTICULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

HIS 1520 (HS)
Honors: Patterns of Global History
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An honors course examining selected themes in global history with an emphasis on the historical context of global issues, processes, trends, and systems as they have affected local regions. HIS 1520 cannot be repeated for credit and does not count toward the requirements for a History major or minor. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

HIS 1525 (HS)
Honors: Problems in Global History
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An in-depth examination of selected events, issues, systems, processes, or developments in global history, and their relationship to and effect upon local regions. Particular emphasis will be given to development of critical thinking skills appropriate to historical inquiry. HIS 1525 cannot be repeated for credit and does not count toward the requirements for a History major or minor.

RM 2140 (HS)
Natural Resources: Becoming an Informed Citizen
3 hours
Fall, Spring

Through the lens of outdoor recreation, this course will examine natural resources to help shape a more
informed citizen. Students will examine dealings with natural resources by looking at how humans value
and define ownership of them, as well as look at natural and outdoor recreation resource management
practices and why they can be controversial or problematic. In addition, this course will look at how
citizens become involved in the politics of natural and outdoor recreation resources.

Shaping the Human Environment

As human beings, we constantly shape and reshape our environment; in doing so we shape and reshape our relationship to the aesthetics of that environment. Courses in this theme could explore the relationship of design choices to varied aesthetic systems and media, how humans produce meaning through interaction with designed artifacts, and ways that design can be used for understanding and improving the human condition.

COM 3531
Mass Media & Society
On Demand

Sustainability and Global Change

Sustainability involves meeting basic human needs without undermining human communities, culture, or natural environments. This difficult goal requires recognition of the complex interrelationships among environmental, economic, and social forces and reexamination of our relationships to technology, natural resources, natural science, human development and/or local to global politics. Topics could include climate change and environmental pollution, economic globalization, north-south disparity, local and global strategies, agriculture and sustainable food production, environmental ethics and history, and social justice.

FCS 2110
Global Awareness: Examining the Human Condition
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A human ecological approach to the issues related to hunger, child and maternal mortality, access to primary education, and reproductive health. Economic, social, political, and geographic concepts will be related to current indicators of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals in order to analyze impacts on individuals and families. Students will develop and evaluate strategies that enhance living conditions for families in local and global contexts. Emphasis will be directed toward families most affected by negative living conditions. Lecture three hours.

FER 1000
Principles of Fermentation Sciences
3 hours
Spring

Principles of fermentation sciences will cover the history, culture, and fundamental science of the fermentation processes; basic food science, microbiology, chemistry, biology, natural products chemistry and nutrition. FER 1000 will introduce concepts relating to the cultivation of grapes, grains and hops utilized in the fermentation industry. Students will be exposed to the basic methods and principles behind the fermentation process including production of cheese, bread, vegetables, meats, beer, wine, bio-fuels and distilled products.

GHY 1010
Introduction to Physical Geography
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A comprehensive study of our physical earth emphasizing the distributional patterns and inter-relatedness of its land, soils, natural vegetation and habitat, and weather and climate. Examinations of environmental issues including hazardous wastes, acid rain, floods, droughts, deforestation and air pollution. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

PHL 2015
Environmental Ethics
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course is an introduction to ethical dimensions of environmental issues. Students will have the opportunity to study theoretical perspectives such as deep ecology, ecofeminism, Native American views of the land, and social ecology. The course will also consider environmental ethical issues such as the moral status of nature, pesticide use, environmental racism, the treatment of animals, deforestation, world population growth, and what it means to live an ecologically responsible life. (WRITING; MULTICULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

PHY 1830
The Physical Principles of Energy and Sustainability
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to the physical principles governing energy and renewable technologies. Topics will include: thermal, geothermal, electrical, magnetic, wind, solar, hydroelectric, nuclear, and other sources of energy as well as other sustainable technologies such as conservation of material resources. PHY 1830 is not open to students who have credit for PHY 1102.

SD 2400
Principles of Sustainable Development
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course is the foundation course for students interested in pursuing a major or a minor in Sustainable Development. The course will introduce students to the concepts and history of "development," the origins of concerns about "sustainability," and the marriage of these two ideas in the contested notion of "sustainable development (SD)." From that basis, the course will then examine the understanding and use of SD principles in and from various disciplinary and multi/interdisciplinary perspectives. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY)

TEC 2029
Society and Technology
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the symbiotic relationship between technology and society. Examples of these relationships will be taken from historical accounts and from analyses of contemporary societies both in industrialized and non- industrialized countries. Lecture three hours. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

Traditions and Innovations

This theme would introduce students to traditions and innovations in forms of creative expression since approximately 1500. In the courses, students would be able to interpret those forms through various theoretical frameworks. In particular, students would understand how those forms change over time, both reflecting and shaping their social, religious, political, and intellectual contexts.

ART 2130 (FA)
Art from 1400 to the Present
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A global survey of art history from 1400 to the present examining the later artistic traditions of Europe, Asia, Africa, Oceania and the Americas. The course focuses on visual art and art making in light of changing social, political, religious, and cultural circumstances. Lecture three hours. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

Science Inquiry - 8 hours

Some courses must be taken in sequence within the theme.

Biology in Society

The purpose of this theme is to provide students with an understanding of the interaction of science and society using a scientific, inquiry-based approach. Each course in the theme will be built around a series of topics that will examine the interest of the topic to the general public, the relationship of the topic to living organisms, and the interdisciplinary processes by which scientists design experiments, analyze their results, and present their findings to the general public. These courses can be taken in any order.

BIO 1201
Biology in Society I
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This lecture course was designed for non-majors and is ideal for students that want to satisfy their interests and natural curiosity about biological systems, but whose primary educational interests lie elsewhere. We will explore the biological basis of relevant societal topics like diet and nutrition, diseases like diabetes and cancer, beneficial versus pathogenic microbes, and stem cell therapies. Our discussions will delve into life at molecular, cellular, and organismal levels while focusing on the practical impact biology has on our lives. This course is offered as part of the "Biology in Society" theme in the General Education Science Inquiry perspective. In order to satisfy this theme, students must take BIO 1201, BIO 1202, and BIO 1203 for a total of eight credit hours. Students may take BIO 1201 and BIO 1202 in either order and must take BIO 1203 in conjunction with either BIO 1201 or BIO 1202. Lecture three hours. (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (NUMERICAL DATA) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.) BIO 1201 WILL NOT SUBSTITUTE FOR BIO 1801 FOR SCIENCE MAJORS.

BIO 1202
Biology in Society II
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This lecture course was designed for non-majors and is ideal for students that want to satisfy their interests and natural curiosity about biological systems, but whose primary educational interests lie elsewhere. We will explore the biological basis of relevant societal topics like the sixth extinction event, conservation ecology, human populations and evolution, and genetically modified organisms used for food, fuel, and remediation. Our discussions will delve into life at organismal, population, community, and ecosystem levels while focusing on the practical impact biology has on our lives. This course is offered as part of the "Biology in Society" theme in the General Education Science Inquiry perspective. In order to satisfy this theme, students must take BIO 1201, BIO 1202, and BIO 1203 for a total of eight credit hours. Students may take BIO 1201 and BIO 1202 in either order and must take BIO 1203 in conjunction with either BIO 1201 or BIO 1202. Lecture three hours. (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (NUMERICAL DATA) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.) BIO 1202 WILL NOT SUBSTITUTE FOR BIO 1802 FOR SCIENCE MAJORS.

BIO 1203
Biology in Society Laboratory
2 hours
Fall, Spring

This lab course was designed for non-majors and will examine current research projects in the ASU Biology Department, ranging from molecular genetics to ecosystem ecology, as well as explore the biological and ecological diversity of the Southern Appalachian Mountains. This lab experience consists of 50 contact hours and is composed of in-lab and online exercises. It is offered as part of the "Biology in Society" theme in the General Education Science Inquiry perspective. In order to satisfy this theme, students must take BIO 1201, BIO 1202, and BIO 1203 for a total of eight credit hours. Students may take BIO 1201 and BIO 1202 in any order and must take BIO 1203 in conjunction with either BIO 1201 or BIO 1202. (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (NUMERICAL DATA) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

Biology in Society (2.0)

BIO 1201
Biology in Society I
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This lecture course was designed for non-majors and is ideal for students that want to satisfy their interests and natural curiosity about biological systems, but whose primary educational interests lie elsewhere. We will explore the biological basis of relevant societal topics like diet and nutrition, diseases like diabetes and cancer, beneficial versus pathogenic microbes, and stem cell therapies. Our discussions will delve into life at molecular, cellular, and organismal levels while focusing on the practical impact biology has on our lives. This course is offered as part of the "Biology in Society" theme in the General Education Science Inquiry perspective. In order to satisfy this theme, students must take BIO 1201, BIO 1202, and BIO 1203 for a total of eight credit hours. Students may take BIO 1201 and BIO 1202 in either order and must take BIO 1203 in conjunction with either BIO 1201 or BIO 1202. Lecture three hours. (Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.) BIO 1201 will not substitute for BIO 1801 for science majors

BIO 1202
Biology in Society II
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This lecture course was designed for non-majors and is ideal for students that want to satisfy their interests and natural curiosity about biological systems, but whose primary educational interests lie elsewhere. We will explore the biological basis of relevant societal topics like the sixth extinction event, conservation ecology, human populations and evolution, and genetically modified organisms used for food, fuel, and remediation. Our discussions will delve into life at organismal, population, community, and ecosystem levels while focusing on the practical impact biology has on our lives. This course is offered as part of the "Biology in Society" theme in the General Education Science Inquiry perspective. In order to satisfy this theme, students must take BIO 1201, BIO 1202, and BIO 1203 for a total of eight credit hours. Students may take BIO 1201 and BIO 1202 in either order and must take BIO 1203 in conjunction with either BIO 1201 or BIO 1202. Lecture three hours. (Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.) BIO 1202 will not substitute for BIO 1802 for science majors.

BIO 1203
Biology in Society Laboratory
2 hours
Fall, Spring

This lab course was designed for non-majors and will examine current research projects in the ASU Biology Department, ranging from molecular genetics to ecosystem ecology, as well as explore the biological and ecological diversity of the Southern Appalachian Mountains. This lab experience consists of 50 contact hours and is composed of in-lab and online exercises. It is offered as part of the "Biology in Society" theme in the General Education Science Inquiry perspective. In order to satisfy this theme, students must take BIO 1201, BIO 1202, and BIO 1203 for a total of eight credit hours. Students may take BIO 1201 and BIO 1202 in any order and must take BIO 1203 in conjunction with either BIO 1201 or BIO 1202. (Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

BIO 1204
Biology in Society I Laboratory
1 hour
Fall, Spring

This course is offered only under special circumstances to students who require a one-credit hour lab course primarily to satisfy the eight-credit hour requirement of the Biology in Society theme in the General Education Science Inquiry perspective. In this course, students will complete one-half of BIO 1203, specifically the in-lab exercises that examine current research projects in the ASU Biology Department. This course maps to the lecture course BIO 1201. Students who require a one-credit hour lab course that maps to the BIO 1202 lecture course should take BIO 1205. Students who require a two-credit hour lab course should take BIO 1203. Students may take either BIO 1204 or BIO 1205 but not both. The combination of BIO 1204 and BIO 1205 is not an acceptable substitute for BIO 1203, and this combination will not count for BIO 1203 credit. Please contact the General Biology Program Director for assistance with registration. (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (NUMERICAL DATA) (ND
Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

BIO 1205
Biology in Society II Laboratory
1 hour
Fall, Spring

This course is offered only under special circumstances to students who require a one-credit hour lab course primarily to satisfy the eight-credit hour requirement of the Biology in Society theme in the General Education Science Inquiry perspective. In this course, students will complete one-half of BIO 1203, specifically the in-lab exercises that examine current research projects in the ASU Biology Department. This course maps to the lecture course BIO 1202. Students who require a one-credit hour lab course that maps to the BIO 1201 lecture course should take BIO 1204. Students who require a two-credit hour lab course should take BIO 1203. Students may take either BIO 1204 or BIO 1205 but not both. The combination of BIO 1204 and BIO 1205 is not an acceptable substitute for BIO 1203, and this combination will not count for BIO 1203 credit. Please contact the General Biology Program Director for assistance with registration. (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (NUMERICAL DATA) (ND
Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

Chemistry Connections to Our Changing World

In this theme, students will explore the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry in lecture, hands-on laboratory settings, and in some cases through discussion. Students will learn how chemists study matter--how substances can be made, characterized, transformed, and improved. Students will also be introduced to a breadth of chemical concepts and how chemistry is connected to biology, physics, geology, and mathematics.

CHE 1101
Introductory Chemistry I
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of the fundamental principles of chemistry emphasizing modern atomic theory, the structure and behavior of atoms, the properties and states of matter, energy relations, periodicity and mole concepts. Lecture three hours. Corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 1110. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

CHE 1102
Introductory Chemistry II
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of properties of solutions, acid-base concepts, equilibria, elementary thermodynamics, elementary kinetics, electrochemistry. Lecture three hours. Prerequisites: CHE 1101 and CHE 1110; corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 1120. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

CHE 1110
Introductory Chemistry Laboratory I
1 hour
Fall, Spring

Laboratory experiments to supplement the study of the topics listed under CHE 1101. Laboratory three hours. Corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 1101. (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES)

CHE 1120
Introductory Chemistry Laboratory
1 hour
Fall, Spring

Laboratory experiments to supplement the study of the topics listed under CHE 1102. Laboratory three hours. Corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 1102. (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES)

Chemistry: Connections to Our Changing World (2.0)

CHE 1101
Introductory Chemistry I
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of the fundamental principles of chemistry emphasizing modern atomic theory, the structure and behavior of atoms, the properties and states of matter, energy relations, periodicity and mole concepts. Lecture three hours. Corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 1110. Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.

CHE 1102
Introductory Chemistry II
3 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of properties of solutions, acid-base concepts, equilibria, elementary thermodynamics, elementary kinetics, electrochemistry. Lecture three hours. Prerequisites: CHE 1101, CHE 1110, and passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010; corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 1120.

CHE 1110
Introductory Chemistry Laboratory I
1 hour
Fall, Spring

Laboratory experiments to supplement the study of the topics listed under CHE 1101. Laboratory three hours. Corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 1101.

CHE 1120
Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II
1 hour
Fall, Spring

Laboratory experiments to supplement the study of the topics listed under CHE 1102. Laboratory three hours. Corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 1102.

Global Environmental Change

Change is a constant component within all of the Earth's systems. Understanding the driving forces behind both natural and anthropogenic change is a key element of science. Topics such as climate change, changing atmospheric composition, the global carbon cycle, the global hydrologic cycle, land use/land cover changes, species migration/extinction, shifting biomes, and others are covered in this theme. Students can choose any two courses in any order to satisfy this theme.

BIO 1103
Global Climate Change and Earth's Life
4 hours
Spring

A course examining the effects of global climate change on earth's organisms. Lecture combines biological concepts with current knowledge and predictions to provide a broad introduction to key changes possible in earth's biota in a future world. Laboratory provides a hands-on approach to investigating climate change questions. Submission of on-line essays, group discussions and summary reports from laboratory experiments required. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

GHY 1011
Global Climate Change
4 hours
Fall, Spring

This course provides a scientific examination of global climate change, including the physical patterns within the atmosphere, climate change due to both natural and anthropogenic forcing mechanisms, and projections of future change at various spatial scales. Students will employ the scientific method in a series of field-based experiments to answer problems and address issues that complement the lecture material and focus on aspects of global climate change. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

GHY 1012
Global Change of the Biosphere
4 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to the patterns, dynamics, and causes of change in the biosphere. Students will examine the fundamental geographic determinants of biodiversity patterns and the natural and human factors that drive biotic change, including climate change, land cover change, and biological invasions. Students will use the scientific method in hands-on laboratory activities to investigate causal relationships between global change processes and biome shifts, species migration, extinction, and loss of biodiversity. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

GLY 1103
Introduction to Environmental and Applied Geology
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A survey of the chemical and physical processes that change the Earth's crust and surface creating geologic hazards and environmental problems for people; human perturbations of the environment that directly and indirectly affect geological change and human life, such as mining, waste disposal, and agricultural practices; and the principles of origin, distribution, availability, environmental consequences of use, and exploration of the Earth's mineral and water resources. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

GLY 1104
Water: Mountains to Sea
4 hours
Fall

A study of the interaction between terrestrial water and geological phenomena. The course applies the scientific method to the study of the continental components of the hydrologic cycle. It also focuses on the interaction of water with the rock and plate tectonic cycles. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

Global Environmental Change (2.0)

BIO 1103
Global Climate Change and Earth’s Life
4 hours
Spring

A course examining the effects of global climate change on earth's organisms. Lecture combines biological concepts with current knowledge and predictions to provide a broad introduction to key changes possible in earth's biota in a future world. Laboratory provides a hands-on approach to investigating climate change questions. Submission of online essays, group discussions and summary reports from laboratory experiments required. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

GHY 1011
Global Climate Change
4 hours
Fall, Spring

This course provides a scientific examination of global climate change, including the physical patterns within the atmosphere, climate change due to both natural and anthropogenic forcing mechanisms, and projections of future change at various spatial scales. Students will employ the scientific method in a series of field-based experiments to answer problems and address issues that complement the lecture material and focus on aspects of global climate change. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

GLY 1010
General Geology Laboratory
1 hour
Fall, Spring

Laboratory exercises to supplement the study of topics listed under GLY 1101, GLY 1102, GLY 1103, GLY 1104,
GLY 1105. Laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours of geology or earth and environmental science. Credit
is not allowed for both GLY 1010 and any of the following: GLY 1101, GLY 1102, GLY 1103, GLY 1104, GLY 1105.

GLY 1103
Environmental Change, Hazards, and Resources
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A survey of the chemical and physical processes that change the Earth’s crust and surface creating geologic hazards and environmental problems for people; human perturbations of the environment that directly and indirectly affect geological change and human life, such as mining, waste disposal, and agricultural practices; and the principles of origin, distribution, availability, environmental consequences of use, and exploration of the Earth’s mineral and water resources. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.

GLY 1104
Water: Mountains to Sea
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of the interaction between terrestrial water and geological phenomena. The course applies the scientific method to the study of the continental components of the hydrologic cycle. It also focuses on the interaction of water with the rock and plate tectonic cycles. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

How Things Work

Physics for non-science majors wishing to understand the fundamental concepts governing our technological world--from rainbows to cell phones to black holes and beyond.

PHY 1101
How Things Work
4 hours
Fall

An introductory survey of the ideas of mechanics, fluids, wave motion, sound, light, and special relativity. Objects from our daily environment will be considered as their operation, histories, and relationships to one another are explored. This course seeks to dispel the mysteries surrounding everyday phenomena. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Corequisite: MAT 1010 or MAT 1020 or MAT 1025. (NUMERICAL DATA; COMPUTER) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

PHY 1102
Environment and Everyday Life
4 hours
Spring

An introductory survey of thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, atomic and nuclear physics. Objects from our daily environment will be considered as their operation, histories, and relationships to one another are explored. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: PHY 1101. PHY 1102 is not open to students who have credit for PHY 1830. (NUMERICAL DATA; COMPUTER) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

How Things Work (2.0)

PHY 1101
How Things Work
4 hours
Fall

An introductory survey of the ideas of mechanics, fluids, wave motion, sound, light, and special relativity. Objects from our daily environment will be considered as their operation, histories, and relationships to one another are explored. This course seeks to dispel the mysteries surrounding everyday phenomena. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Corequisite: MAT 1010 or MAT 1020 or MAT 1025. Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.

PHY 1102
Environment and Everyday Life
4 hours
Spring

An introductory survey of thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, atomic and nuclear physics. Objects from our daily environment will be considered as their operation, histories, and relationships to one another are explored. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: PHY 1101 and passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.. PHY 1102 is not open to students who have credit for PHY 1830.

PHY 1111
How Things Work - Lab
1 hour
Fall

An introductory laboratory survey of the ideas of mechanics, fluids, wave motion, sound, and light. Objects from our daily environment will be considered as their operation, histories, and relationships to one another are explored. Laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours of PHY 1101 transferred from another institution.

PHY 1112
Environment and Everyday Life - Lab
1 hour
Spring

An introductory laboratory survey of thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, atomic and nuclear physics. Objects from our daily environment will be considered as their operation, histories, and relationships to one another are explored. Laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours of PHY 1102 transferred from another institution.

Life, Earth, and Evolution

Life, Earth and Evolution considers the history of life on earth including the origins of life, its long geologic history, and the evolution of humans. Basic principles of evolution, genetics and ecology help students understand the biological principles underpinning the history of life. Students can choose any two course in any order to satisfy this theme.

ANT 1430
Our Primate Heritage
4 hours
Fall, Spring

This course examines humans within an evolutionary and biocultural perspective. Students will be introduced to classic and contemporary literature on topics in human evolution and will have the opportunity to make their own observations and analyses within the laboratory. We will explore theoretical frameworks and controversies about important issues such as the nature of science, human variation, and the relationship between humans and our environment. Students will become familiar with evolutionary theory and heredity, primate evolution and basic comparative anatomy, and the fossil record of human evolution. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

GLY 1102
Introduction to Historical Geology
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of the historical and biological aspects of the science of geology – tectonic models for understanding earth structure and lithospheric history, the physical and paleontological bases for understanding geologic time and dating rocks, biological principles relating to the evolution of organisms revealed in the fossil record, facts and theories of biological evolution, a survey of the evolution of organisms through time, the geologic history of North America, and discussion of the scientific aspects of the scientific-religious controversy of evolution vs. creationism. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY; NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

Life, Earth, and Evolution (2.0)

ANT 1430
Our Primate Heritage
4 hours
Fall, Spring

This course examines humans within an evolutionary and biocultural perspective. Students will be introduced to classic and contemporary literature on topics in human evolution and will have the opportunity to make their own observations and analyses within the laboratory. We will explore theoretical frameworks and controversies about important issues such as the nature of science, human variation, and the relationship between humans and our environment. Students will become familiar with evolutionary theory and heredity, primate evolution and basic comparative anatomy, and the fossil record of human evolution. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

GLY 1010
General Geology Laboratory
1 hour
Fall, Spring

Laboratory exercises to supplement the study of topics listed under GLY 1101, GLY 1102, GLY 1103, GLY 1104,
GLY 1105. Laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours of geology or earth and environmental science. Credit
is not allowed for both GLY 1010 and any of the following: GLY 1101, GLY 1102, GLY 1103, GLY 1104, GLY 1105.

GLY 1102
Introduction to Historical Geology
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of the historical and biological aspects of the science of geology – tectonic models for understanding earth
structure and lithospheric history, the physical and paleontological bases for understanding geologic time and dating
rocks, biological principles relating to the evolution of organisms revealed in the fossil record, facts and theories of
biological evolution, a survey of the evolution of organisms through time, the geologic history of North America, and
discussion of the scientific aspects of the scientific-religious controversy of evolution vs. creationism. Lecture three
hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.

Physics of Our Technological World (2.0)

PHY 1103-PHY 1104
General Physics I-II
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of the basic principles of physics including mechanics, thermodynamics, sound, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Corequisite for PHY 1103: MAT 1020 or MAT 1025 or the equivalent. Prerequisite for PHY 1104: PHY 1103 or the equivalent. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (4-4).F;S.-F;S.

PHY 1113
General Physics I - Lab
1 hour
Fall

A laboratory study of the basic principles of physics including mechanics, thermodynamics, sound, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours of PHY 1103 transferred from another institution.

PHY 1114
General Physics II - Lab
1 hour
Spring

A laboratory study of the basic principles of physics including mechanics, thermodynamics, sound, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours of PHY 1104 transferred from another institution. 

Physics of Self Expression

Courses aimed at empowering the creative mind by linking artistic expression with scientific principles and the relationships that underlie them.

PHY 1101
How Things Work
4 hours
Fall

An introductory survey of the ideas of mechanics, fluids, wave motion, sound, light, and special relativity. Objects from our daily environment will be considered as their operation, histories, and relationships to one another are explored. This course seeks to dispel the mysteries surrounding everyday phenomena. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Corequisite: MAT 1010 or MAT 1020 or MAT 1025. (NUMERICAL DATA; COMPUTER) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

PHY 1810
Light and Color
4 hours
Spring

An introductory course intended primarily for students of the fine and applied arts as well as others interested in optical phenomena. Topics include the perception of light and color, color mixing, polarized light, photography, lasers, and holography. The laboratory will involve hands-on investigation of the properties of light using various methods including but not limited to lasers, spectrometers, lenses and mirrors, and photographic equipment. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: MAT 1025 or permission of the instructor. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY; NUMERICAL DATA) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

PHY 1812
Acoustics and Harmonics
4 hours
Fall

An exploration of sound and the underlying physical principles that govern it: Newton's laws of motion, energy, power, pressure, elasticity, oscillations, waves, resonances, and harmonics, as well as the quantitative application of these principles to topics such as: musical intervals, the equal-tempered scale, the decibel scale, harmony, dissonance, overtones, hearing, voices, and the construction and timbre of musical instruments. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: MAT 1025 or permission of the instructor. (CROSS DISCIPLINARY; NUMERICAL DATA) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

PHY 1814
Sound and Recording
4 hours
Spring

An exploration of acoustics, electronic circuits and signal processing as it applies to the creation and recording of sound and music. Topics to be covered include: AC and DC circuits, filtering, amplification, mechanical and electromagnetic properties of speakers, microphones, analog and digital recording, acoustics of rooms, digital audio signal processing, electronic synthesizers, multi-track recording, and mastering. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: PHY 1812 or PHY 1103 or PHY 1150. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY; NUMERICAL DATA) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

Physics of Self Expression (2.0)

PHY 1101
How Things Work
4 hours
Fall

An introductory survey of the ideas of mechanics, fluids, wave motion, sound, light, and special relativity. Objects from our daily environment will be considered as their operation, histories, and relationships to one another are explored. This course seeks to dispel the mysteries surrounding everyday phenomena. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Corequisite: MAT 1010 or MAT 1020 or MAT 1025. Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.

PHY 1111
How Things Work - Lab
1 hour
Fall

An introductory laboratory survey of the ideas of mechanics, fluids, wave motion, sound, and light. Objects from our daily environment will be considered as their operation, histories, and relationships to one another are explored. Laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours of PHY 1101 transferred from another institution.

PHY 1812
Acoustics and Harmonics
4 hours
Fall

An exploration of sound and the underlying physical principles that govern it: Newton’s laws of motion, energy, power, pressure, elasticity, oscillations, waves, resonances, and harmonics, as well as the quantitative application of these principles to topics such as: musical intervals, the equal-tempered scale, the decibel scale, harmony, dissonance, overtones, hearing, voices, and the construction and timbre of musical instruments. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: MAT 1010 or permission of the instructor and passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.

PHY 1814
Sound and Recording
4 hours
Spring

An exploration of acoustics, electronic circuits and signal processing as it applies to the creation and recording of sound and music. Topics to be covered include: AC and DC circuits, filtering, amplification, mechanical and electromagnetic properties of speakers, microphones, analog and digital recording, acoustics of rooms, digital audio signal processing, electronic synthesizers, multi-track recording, and mastering. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: PHY 1812 or PHY 1103 or PHY 1150 and passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.

Physics with Calculus

A sequence for scientists, engineers, and educators that presents a calculus-based overview of the physical laws governing the universe.

PHY 1150
Analytical Physics I
4 hours
Fall, Spring

An analytical and quantitative treatment of physics at a somewhat more advanced level than the PHY 1103-PHY 1104 sequence using calculus. Intended primarily for students majoring in the natural sciences, mathematical sciences, and pre engineering. Topics covered include mechanics, heat, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, and quantum phenomena. Corequisite for PHY 1150: MAT 1110. Corequisite for PHY 1151: MAT 1120. Lecture four hours, laboratory three hours. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

PHY 1151
Analytical Physics II
4 hours
Fall, Spring

An analytical and quantitative treatment of physics at a somewhat more advanced level than the PHY 1103-PHY 1104 sequence using calculus. Intended primarily for students majoring in the natural sciences, mathematical sciences, and pre engineering. Topics covered include mechanics, heat, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, and quantum phenomena. Corequisite for PHY 1150: MAT 1110. Corequisite for PHY 1151: MAT 1120. Lecture four hours, laboratory three hours. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

Physics with Calculus (2.0)

PHY 1150-PHY 1151
Analytical Physics I-II
5 hours
Fall, Spring

An analytical and quantitative treatment of physics at a somewhat more advanced level than the PHY 1103-PHY 1104 sequence using calculus. Intended primarily for students majoring in the natural sciences, mathematical sciences, and pre-engineering. Topics covered include mechanics, heat, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, and quantum phenomena. Corequisite for PHY 1150: MAT 1110. Corequisite for PHY 1151: MAT 1120. Lecture four hours, laboratory three hours. (5-5).F;S-F;S.

PHY 1160
Analytical Physics I - Lab
1 hour
Fall

Laboratory exercises in mechanics, heat, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, and quantum phenomena at a somewhat more advanced level than the PHY 1103-PHY 1104 sequence using calculus. Intended primarily for students majoring in the natural sciences, mathematical sciences, and pre-engineering. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: 3-4 credit hours of PHY 1150 transferred from another institution.

PHY 1161
Analytical Physics II - Lab
1 hour
Spring

Laboratory exercises in mechanics, heat, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, and quantum phenomena at a somewhat more advanced level than the PHY 1103-PHY 1104 sequence using calculus. Intended primarily for students majoring in the natural sciences, mathematical sciences, and pre-engineering. Laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: 3-4 credit hours of PHY 1151 transferred from another institution.

Restless Planet: Earth, Environment and Evolution

This theme consists of eight semester hours chosen from Physical Geology, Historical Geology and Environmental Geology. These courses explore the physical aspects of the planet, its history, and the environmental challenges faced by humans as we interact with and impact our environment. Students will choose any two of the three courses, which can be taken in any sequence.

GLY 1101
Introduction to Physical Geology
4 hours
Fall, Spring

Introduction to the composition, origin, and modification of Earth materials through the study of the Earth's interacting dynamic systems; study and application of the scientific method with reference to the principles of geology as demonstrated through use of case histories and laboratory material. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

GLY 1102
Introduction to Historical Geology
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of the historical and biological aspects of the science of geology – tectonic models for understanding earth structure and lithospheric history, the physical and paleontological bases for understanding geologic time and dating rocks, biological principles relating to the evolution of organisms revealed in the fossil record, facts and theories of biological evolution, a survey of the evolution of organisms through time, the geologic history of North America, and discussion of the scientific aspects of the scientific-religious controversy of evolution vs. creationism. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY; NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

GLY 1103
Introduction to Environmental and Applied Geology
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A survey of the chemical and physical processes that change the Earth's crust and surface creating geologic hazards and environmental problems for people; human perturbations of the environment that directly and indirectly affect geological change and human life, such as mining, waste disposal, and agricultural practices; and the principles of origin, distribution, availability, environmental consequences of use, and exploration of the Earth's mineral and water resources. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

Restless Planet: Earth, Environment, and Evolution (2.0)

GLY 1010
General Geology Laboratory
1 hour
Fall, Spring

Laboratory exercises to supplement the study of topics listed under GLY 1101, GLY 1102, GLY 1103, GLY 1104,
GLY 1105. Laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours of geology or earth and environmental science. Credit
is not allowed for both GLY 1010 and any of the following: GLY 1101, GLY 1102, GLY 1103, GLY 1104, GLY 1105.

GLY 1101
Introduction to Physical Geology
4 hours
Fall, Spring

Introduction to the composition, origin, and modification of Earth materials through the study of the Earth's
interacting dynamic systems; study and application of the scientific method with reference to the principles of geology
as demonstrated through use of case histories and laboratory material. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.
Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.

GLY 1102
Introduction to Historical Geology
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of the historical and biological aspects of the science of geology – tectonic models for understanding earth
structure and lithospheric history, the physical and paleontological bases for understanding geologic time and dating
rocks, biological principles relating to the evolution of organisms revealed in the fossil record, facts and theories of
biological evolution, a survey of the evolution of organisms through time, the geologic history of North America, and
discussion of the scientific aspects of the scientific-religious controversy of evolution vs. creationism. Lecture three
hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.

GLY 1103
Environmental Change, Hazards, and Resources
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A survey of the chemical and physical processes that change the Earth’s crust and surface creating geologic hazards and environmental problems for people; human perturbations of the environment that directly and indirectly affect geological change and human life, such as mining, waste disposal, and agricultural practices; and the principles of origin, distribution, availability, environmental consequences of use, and exploration of the Earth’s mineral and water resources. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.

The Blue Planet

The hydrologic cycle and its interactions with geology in the form of the rock cycle and plate tectonic cycle will be the context in which water will be studied in each of these courses. The different courses in the theme will emphasize different components of the geologic influence on the hydrologic cycle. GLY 1104 will cover terrestrial components of the hydrologic cycle, while GLY 1105 will cover oceanic components of the hydrologic cycle in addition to physical, chemical, and biological components. These courses can be taken in any order.

GLY 1104
Water: Mountains to Sea
4 hours
Fall

A study of the interaction between terrestrial water and geological phenomena. The course applies the scientific method to the study of the continental components of the hydrologic cycle. It also focuses on the interaction of water with the rock and plate tectonic cycles. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

GLY 1105
Oceanography
4 hours
Spring

A study of physical, chemical, biological, and geological oceanography and their interrelationships. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (WRITING; NUMERICAL DATA) (ND prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

The Blue Planet (2.0)

GLY 1010
General Geology Laboratory
1 hour
Fall, Spring

Laboratory exercises to supplement the study of topics listed under GLY 1101, GLY 1102, GLY 1103, GLY 1104,
GLY 1105. Laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours of geology or earth and environmental science. Credit
is not allowed for both GLY 1010 and any of the following: GLY 1101, GLY 1102, GLY 1103, GLY 1104, GLY 1105.

GLY 1104
Water: Mountains to Sea
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of the interaction between terrestrial water and geological phenomena. The course applies the scientific method to the study of the continental components of the hydrologic cycle. It also focuses on the interaction of water with the rock and plate tectonic cycles. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

GLY 1105
Oceanography
4 hours
Spring

A study of physical, chemical, biological, and geological oceanography and their interrelationships. Lecture three
hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.

The Physics of Our Technological World

An in-depth sequence at the algebra and trigonometric level for those who need to be accomplished in physics for their professional careers or general interest.

PHY 1103
General Physics I
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of the basic principles of physics including mechanics, thermodynamics, sound, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Corequisite for PHY 1103: MAT 1020 or MAT 1025 or the equivalent. Prerequisite for PHY 1104: PHY 1103 or the equivalent. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

PHY 1104
General Physics II
4 hours
Fall, Spring

A study of the basic principles of physics including mechanics, thermodynamics, sound, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Corequisite for PHY 1103: MAT 1020 or MAT 1025 or the equivalent. Prerequisite for PHY 1104: PHY 1103 or the equivalent. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

Voyages Through the Cosmos

The first course in this theme. AST 1001, examines the workings of the celestial sphere, how light behaves as a cosmic messenger about distant astronomical objects and how gravity shapes the formation, structure and motions of these objects, followed by an in-depth tour of our solar system. AST 1002 moves outward to study the Sun, the birth, life and death of stars, black holes, galaxies filled with dark matter and dark energy and the structure of the Universe. During both semesters, students will use state-of-the-art telescope/camera systems to make their own astronomical observations and discoveries.

AST 1001
Introductory Astronomy I – The Solar System
4 hours
Fall

Topics to be covered include constellations, telescopes, the sun and moon, planets, asteroids, comets, the origin of the solar system and the search for extra-terrestrial life. The laboratory includes visual observations and electronic imaging of astronomical objects as well as a field trip to Appalachian's Dark Sky Observatory. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

AST 1002
Introductory Astronomy II – Stars and Galaxies
4 hours
Spring

A study of astronomical objects located beyond our solar system. Topics to be covered include the structure and evolution of the stars, pulsars, black holes, gaseous nebulae, star clusters, galaxies, quasars and the structure of evolution of the Universe. Night observations of these types of objects will be made. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: AST 1001. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

Voyages Through the Cosmos (2.0)

AST 1001
Introductory Astronomy I – The Solar System
4 hours
Fall

Topics to be covered include constellations, telescopes, the sun and moon, planets, asteroids, comets, the origin of the solar system and the search for extra-terrestrial life. The laboratory includes visual observations and electronic imaging of astronomical objects as well as a field trip to Appalachian's Dark Sky Observatory. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.

AST 1002
Introductory Astronomy II – Stars and Galaxies
4 hours
Spring

A study of astronomical objects located beyond our solar system. Topics to be covered include the structure and evolution of the stars, pulsars, black holes, gaseous nebulae, star clusters, galaxies, quasars and the structure of evolution of the Universe. Night observations of these types of objects will be made. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: AST 1001 and passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.

AST 1011
Introductory Astronomy I – The Solar System Lab
1 hour
Fall

Includes visual observations and electronic imaging of astronomical objects as well as a field trip to Appalachian's Dark Sky Observatory. Laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours of AST 1001 transferred from another institution.

AST 1012
Introductory Astronomy II – Stars and Galaxies Lab
1 hour
Spring

Night observations of stars, gaseous nebulae, star clusters, and galaxies will be made as part of a study of astronomical objects located beyond our solar system. Laboratory two hours. Prerequisites: AST 1001 and 3 credit hours of AST 1002 transferred from another institution.

First Year Writing - 3 hours

ENG 1000
Expository Writing
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to the various types of expository essays. A grade of "C" or higher in this course fulfills the English proficiency requirement for students entering the Reich College of Education or the Walker College of Business. (WRITING) (CORE: ENGLISH)

LLC 1000
English for International Students
3 hours
Fall

Listening, speaking, reading and writing English for advanced students whose first language is not English. Emphasis on communication in a variety of academic and social settings. This course is self-paced to enable the student to concentrate on individual needs and problem areas. In addition to class meetings, students will be assigned a tutor to assist them with assignments

LLC 1000 (formerly FL 1000)
English for International Students
3 hours
Fall

Listening, speaking, reading and writing English for advanced students whose first language is not English. Emphasis on communication in a variety of academic and social settings. This course is self-paced to enable the student to concentrate on individual needs and problem areas. In addition to class meetings, students will be assigned a tutor to assist them with assignments.

R C 1000
Expository Writing
3 hours
Fall, Spring

An introduction to the various types of expository essays. A grade of “C” or higher in this course fulfills the English proficiency requirement for students entering the Reich College of Education or the Walker College of Business.

WGC 1103*
Investigations: Local
6 hours
Fall

Priority enrollment given to Watauga Global Community students. An experiential, interdisciplinary study in the humanities and social sciences of significant local issues (historical, economic, social, cultural, ideological, aesthetic) and their relationships with regional, national, and global issues.

*Watauga Global Community students only

WRC 1103, Investigations: Local
Investigations: Local
6 hours
Fall

An experiential, interdisciplinary study in the humanities and social sciences of significant local issues (historical, economic, social, cultural, ideological, aesthetic) and their relationships with regional, national, and global issues.

Sophomore Writing - 3 hours

ENG 2001
Introduction to Writing Across the Curriculum
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course introduces students to writing across the curriculum. Students write in different genres for different academic communities, read a variety of academic texts rhetorically, and analyze the writing
conventions of various academic communities. Prerequisites: completion of 30 semester hours of credit, including ENG 1000 and UCO 1200. (WRITING) (CORE: ENGLISH)

R C 2001
Introduction to Writing Across the Curriculum
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course introduces students to writing across the curriculum. Students write in different genres for different academic communities, read a variety of academic texts rhetorically, and analyze the writing conventions of various academic communities. Prerequisites: completion of 30 semester hours of credit, including R C 1000 and UCO 1200.

WGC 2001
Tangents
3 hours
Fall, Spring

Priority enrollment given to Watauga Global Community Students. This course introduces students to writing across the curriculum. Students write in different genres for different academic communities, read a variety of academic texts rhetorically, and analyze the writing conventions of various academic communities. Prerequisites: completion of 30 semester hours of credit including WGC 1103; OR, completion of 30 semester hours of credit including ENG 1000 and either UCO 1200 or HON 1515. (WRITING)

WRC 2001
Days in the Life
3 hours
Fall, Spring

This course introduces students to writing across the curriculum. Students write in different genres for different academic communities, read a variety of academic texts rhetorically, and analyze the writing conventions of various academic communities. Prerequisites: completion of 30 semester hours of credit including WRC 1103; OR, completion of 30 semester hours of credit including R C 1000 and either UCO 1200 or HON 1515.

Junior Writing in the major

Hours: 
in the Major
Version: 
1
2

(*ENG 2001 or its equivalent is a prerequisite for all Junior Writing in the Major/Discipline courses. The hours earned in the Junior Writing in the Discipline course count in the major requirements, not in the 44 hours of General Education requirements.)

Senior Capstone Experience in the major

Hours: 
in the major
Version: 
1
2

(*The hours earned in the Senior Capstone count in the major requirements, not in the 44 hours of General Education requirements.)