Science Inquiry - 8 hours

Biology in Society

The purpose of this theme is to provide students with an understanding of the interaction of science and society using a scientific, inquiry-based approach. Each course in the theme will be built around a series of topics that will examine the interest of the topic to the general public, the relationship of the topic to living organisms, and the interdisciplinary processes by which scientists design experiments, analyze their results, and present their findings to the general public. These courses can be taken in any order.

BIO 1202

Biology in Society II (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This lecture course was designed for non-majors and is ideal for students that want to satisfy their interests and natural curiosity about biological systems, but whose primary educational interests lie elsewhere. We will explore the biological basis of relevant societal topics like the sixth extinction event, conservation ecology, human populations and evolution, and genetically modified organisms used for food, fuel, and remediation. Our discussions will delve into life at organismal, population, community, and ecosystem levels while focusing on the practical impact biology has on our lives. This course is offered as part of the "Biology in Society" theme in the General Education Science Inquiry perspective. In order to satisfy this theme, students must take BIO 1201, BIO 1202, and BIO 1203 for a total of eight credit hours. Students may take BIO 1201 and BIO 1202 in either order and must take BIO 1203 in conjunction with either BIO 1201 or BIO 1202. Lecture three hours. (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (NUMERICAL DATA) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.) BIO 1202 WILL NOT SUBSTITUTE FOR BIO 1802 FOR SCIENCE MAJORS.

BIO 1203

Biology in Society Laboratory (2 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This lab course was designed for non-majors and will examine current research projects in the ASU Biology Department, ranging from molecular genetics to ecosystem ecology, as well as explore the biological and ecological diversity of the Southern Appalachian Mountains. This lab experience consists of 50 contact hours and is composed of in-lab and online exercises. It is offered as part of the "Biology in Society" theme in the General Education Science Inquiry perspective. In order to satisfy this theme, students must take BIO 1201, BIO 1202, and BIO 1203 for a total of eight credit hours. Students may take BIO 1201 and BIO 1202 in any order and must take BIO 1203 in conjunction with either BIO 1201 or BIO 1202. (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (NUMERICAL DATA) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

BIO 1201

Biology in Society I (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This lecture course was designed for non-majors and is ideal for students that want to satisfy their interests and natural curiosity about biological systems, but whose primary educational interests lie elsewhere. We will explore the biological basis of relevant societal topics like diet and nutrition, diseases like diabetes and cancer, beneficial versus pathogenic microbes, and stem cell therapies. Our discussions will delve into life at molecular, cellular, and organismal levels while focusing on the practical impact biology has on our lives. This course is offered as part of the "Biology in Society" theme in the General Education Science Inquiry perspective. In order to satisfy this theme, students must take BIO 1201, BIO 1202, and BIO 1203 for a total of eight credit hours. Students may take BIO 1201 and BIO 1202 in either order and must take BIO 1203 in conjunction with either BIO 1201 or BIO 1202. Lecture three hours. (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (NUMERICAL DATA) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.) BIO 1201 WILL NOT SUBSTITUTE FOR BIO 1801 FOR SCIENCE MAJORS.

The Physics of Our Technological World

An in-depth sequence at the algebra and trigonometric level for those who need to be accomplished in physics for their professional careers or general interest.

PHY 1104

General Physics II (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A study of the basic principles of physics including mechanics, thermodynamics, sound, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Corequisite for PHY 1103: MAT 1020 or MAT 1025 or the equivalent. Prerequisite for PHY 1104: PHY 1103 or the equivalent. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

PHY 1103

General Physics I (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A study of the basic principles of physics including mechanics, thermodynamics, sound, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Corequisite for PHY 1103: MAT 1020 or MAT 1025 or the equivalent. Prerequisite for PHY 1104: PHY 1103 or the equivalent. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

Physics with Calculus

A sequence for scientists, engineers, and educators that presents a calculus-based overview of the physical laws governing the universe.

PHY 1150

Analytical Physics I (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An analytical and quantitative treatment of physics at a somewhat more advanced level than the PHY 1103-PHY 1104 sequence using calculus. Intended primarily for students majoring in the natural sciences, mathematical sciences, and pre engineering. Topics covered include mechanics, heat, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, and quantum phenomena. Corequisite for PHY 1150: MAT 1110. Corequisite for PHY 1151: MAT 1120. Lecture four hours, laboratory three hours. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

PHY 1151

Analytical Physics II (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An analytical and quantitative treatment of physics at a somewhat more advanced level than the PHY 1103-PHY 1104 sequence using calculus. Intended primarily for students majoring in the natural sciences, mathematical sciences, and pre engineering. Topics covered include mechanics, heat, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, and quantum phenomena. Corequisite for PHY 1150: MAT 1110. Corequisite for PHY 1151: MAT 1120. Lecture four hours, laboratory three hours. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

Physics of Self Expression

Courses aimed at empowering the creative mind by linking artistic expression with scientific principles and the relationships that underlie them.

PHY 1101

How Things Work (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

An introductory survey of the ideas of mechanics, fluids, wave motion, sound, light, and special relativity. Objects from our daily environment will be considered as their operation, histories, and relationships to one another are explored. This course seeks to dispel the mysteries surrounding everyday phenomena. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Corequisite: MAT 1010 or MAT 1020 or MAT 1025. (NUMERICAL DATA; COMPUTER) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

PHY 1810

Light and Color (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

An introductory course intended primarily for students of the fine and applied arts as well as others interested in optical phenomena. Topics include the perception of light and color, color mixing, polarized light, photography, lasers, and holography. The laboratory will involve hands-on investigation of the properties of light using various methods including but not limited to lasers, spectrometers, lenses and mirrors, and photographic equipment. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: MAT 1025 or permission of the instructor. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY; NUMERICAL DATA) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

PHY 1812

Acoustics and Harmonics (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

An exploration of sound and the underlying physical principles that govern it: Newton's laws of motion, energy, power, pressure, elasticity, oscillations, waves, resonances, and harmonics, as well as the quantitative application of these principles to topics such as: musical intervals, the equal-tempered scale, the decibel scale, harmony, dissonance, overtones, hearing, voices, and the construction and timbre of musical instruments. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: MAT 1025 or permission of the instructor. (CROSS DISCIPLINARY; NUMERICAL DATA) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

PHY 1814

Sound and Recording (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

An exploration of acoustics, electronic circuits and signal processing as it applies to the creation and recording of sound and music. Topics to be covered include: AC and DC circuits, filtering, amplification, mechanical and electromagnetic properties of speakers, microphones, analog and digital recording, acoustics of rooms, digital audio signal processing, electronic synthesizers, multi-track recording, and mastering. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: PHY 1812 or PHY 1103 or PHY 1150. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY; NUMERICAL DATA) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

Chemistry Connections to Our Changing World

In this theme, students will explore the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry in lecture, hands-on laboratory settings, and in some cases through discussion. Students will learn how chemists study matter--how substances can be made, characterized, transformed, and improved. Students will also be introduced to a breadth of chemical concepts and how chemistry is connected to biology, physics, geology, and mathematics.

CHE 1101

Introductory Chemistry I (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A study of the fundamental principles of chemistry emphasizing modern atomic theory, the structure and behavior of atoms, the properties and states of matter, energy relations, periodicity and mole concepts. Lecture three hours. Corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 1110. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

CHE 1110

Introductory Chemistry Laboratory I (1 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

Laboratory experiments to supplement the study of the topics listed under CHE 1101. Laboratory three hours. Corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 1101. (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES)

CHE 1102

Introductory Chemistry II (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A study of properties of solutions, acid-base concepts, equilibria, elementary thermodynamics, elementary kinetics, electrochemistry. Lecture three hours. Prerequisites: CHE 1101 and CHE 1110; corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 1120. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

CHE 1120

Introductory Chemistry Laboratory (1 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

Laboratory experiments to supplement the study of the topics listed under CHE 1102. Laboratory three hours. Corequisite or prerequisite: CHE 1102. (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES)

Global Environmental Change

Change is a constant component within all of the Earth's systems. Understanding the driving forces behind both natural and anthropogenic change is a key element of science. Topics such as climate change, changing atmospheric composition, the global carbon cycle, the global hydrologic cycle, land use/land cover changes, species migration/extinction, shifting biomes, and others are covered in this theme. Students can choose any two courses in any order to satisfy this theme.

BIO 1103

Global Climate Change and Earth's Life (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

A course examining the effects of global climate change on earth's organisms. Lecture combines biological concepts with current knowledge and predictions to provide a broad introduction to key changes possible in earth's biota in a future world. Laboratory provides a hands-on approach to investigating climate change questions. Submission of on-line essays, group discussions and summary reports from laboratory experiments required. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

GHY 1011

Global Climate Change (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course provides a scientific examination of global climate change, including the physical patterns within the atmosphere, climate change due to both natural and anthropogenic forcing mechanisms, and projections of future change at various spatial scales. Students will employ the scientific method in a series of field-based experiments to answer problems and address issues that complement the lecture material and focus on aspects of global climate change. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

GHY 1012

Global Change of the Biosphere (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An introduction to the patterns, dynamics, and causes of change in the biosphere. Students will examine the fundamental geographic determinants of biodiversity patterns and the natural and human factors that drive biotic change, including climate change, land cover change, and biological invasions. Students will use the scientific method in hands-on laboratory activities to investigate causal relationships between global change processes and biome shifts, species migration, extinction, and loss of biodiversity. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

GLY 1104

Water: Mountains to Sea (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

A study of the interaction between terrestrial water and geological phenomena. The course applies the scientific method to the study of the continental components of the hydrologic cycle. It also focuses on the interaction of water with the rock and plate tectonic cycles. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

GLY 1103

Introduction to Environmental and Applied Geology (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A survey of the chemical and physical processes that change the Earth's crust and surface creating geologic hazards and environmental problems for people; human perturbations of the environment that directly and indirectly affect geological change and human life, such as mining, waste disposal, and agricultural practices; and the principles of origin, distribution, availability, environmental consequences of use, and exploration of the Earth's mineral and water resources. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

How Things Work

Physics for non-science majors wishing to understand the fundamental concepts governing our technological world--from rainbows to cell phones to black holes and beyond.

PHY 1102

Environment and Everyday Life (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

An introductory survey of thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, atomic and nuclear physics. Objects from our daily environment will be considered as their operation, histories, and relationships to one another are explored. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: PHY 1101. PHY 1102 is not open to students who have credit for PHY 1830. (NUMERICAL DATA; COMPUTER) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

PHY 1101

How Things Work (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

An introductory survey of the ideas of mechanics, fluids, wave motion, sound, light, and special relativity. Objects from our daily environment will be considered as their operation, histories, and relationships to one another are explored. This course seeks to dispel the mysteries surrounding everyday phenomena. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Corequisite: MAT 1010 or MAT 1020 or MAT 1025. (NUMERICAL DATA; COMPUTER) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

Life, Earth, and Evolution

Life, Earth and Evolution considers the history of life on earth including the origins of life, its long geologic history, and the evolution of humans. Basic principles of evolution, genetics and ecology help students understand the biological principles underpinning the history of life. Students can choose any two course in any order to satisfy this theme.

GLY 1102

Introduction to Historical Geology (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A study of the historical and biological aspects of the science of geology – tectonic models for understanding earth structure and lithospheric history, the physical and paleontological bases for understanding geologic time and dating rocks, biological principles relating to the evolution of organisms revealed in the fossil record, facts and theories of biological evolution, a survey of the evolution of organisms through time, the geologic history of North America, and discussion of the scientific aspects of the scientific-religious controversy of evolution vs. creationism. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY; NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

ANT 1430

Our Primate Heritage (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course examines humans within an evolutionary and biocultural perspective. Students will be introduced to classic and contemporary literature on topics in human evolution and will have the opportunity to make their own observations and analyses within the laboratory. We will explore theoretical frameworks and controversies about important issues such as the nature of science, human variation, and the relationship between humans and our environment. Students will become familiar with evolutionary theory and heredity, primate evolution and basic comparative anatomy, and the fossil record of human evolution. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

Restless Planet: Earth, Environment and Evolution

This theme consists of eight semester hours chosen from Physical Geology, Historical Geology and Environmental Geology. These courses explore the physical aspects of the planet, its history, and the environmental challenges faced by humans as we interact with and impact our environment. Students will choose any two of the three courses, which can be taken in any sequence.

GLY 1102

Introduction to Historical Geology (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A study of the historical and biological aspects of the science of geology – tectonic models for understanding earth structure and lithospheric history, the physical and paleontological bases for understanding geologic time and dating rocks, biological principles relating to the evolution of organisms revealed in the fossil record, facts and theories of biological evolution, a survey of the evolution of organisms through time, the geologic history of North America, and discussion of the scientific aspects of the scientific-religious controversy of evolution vs. creationism. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY; NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

GLY 1101

Introduction to Physical Geology (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

Introduction to the composition, origin, and modification of Earth materials through the study of the Earth's interacting dynamic systems; study and application of the scientific method with reference to the principles of geology as demonstrated through use of case histories and laboratory material. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

GLY 1103

Introduction to Environmental and Applied Geology (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A survey of the chemical and physical processes that change the Earth's crust and surface creating geologic hazards and environmental problems for people; human perturbations of the environment that directly and indirectly affect geological change and human life, such as mining, waste disposal, and agricultural practices; and the principles of origin, distribution, availability, environmental consequences of use, and exploration of the Earth's mineral and water resources. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

The Blue Planet

The hydrologic cycle and its interactions with geology in the form of the rock cycle and plate tectonic cycle will be the context in which water will be studied in each of these courses. The different courses in the theme will emphasize different components of the geologic influence on the hydrologic cycle. GLY 1104 will cover terrestrial components of the hydrologic cycle, while GLY 1105 will cover oceanic components of the hydrologic cycle in addition to physical, chemical, and biological components. These courses can be taken in any order.

GLY 1104

Water: Mountains to Sea (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

A study of the interaction between terrestrial water and geological phenomena. The course applies the scientific method to the study of the continental components of the hydrologic cycle. It also focuses on the interaction of water with the rock and plate tectonic cycles. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

GLY 1105

Oceanography (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

A study of physical, chemical, biological, and geological oceanography and their interrelationships. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (WRITING; NUMERICAL DATA) (ND prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

Voyages Through the Cosmos

The first course in this theme. AST 1001, examines the workings of the celestial sphere, how light behaves as a cosmic messenger about distant astronomical objects and how gravity shapes the formation, structure and motions of these objects, followed by an in-depth tour of our solar system. AST 1002 moves outward to study the Sun, the birth, life and death of stars, black holes, galaxies filled with dark matter and dark energy and the structure of the Universe. During both semesters, students will use state-of-the-art telescope/camera systems to make their own astronomical observations and discoveries.

AST 1001

Introductory Astronomy I – The Solar System (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

Topics to be covered include constellations, telescopes, the sun and moon, planets, asteroids, comets, the origin of the solar system and the search for extra-terrestrial life. The laboratory includes visual observations and electronic imaging of astronomical objects as well as a field trip to Appalachian's Dark Sky Observatory. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

AST 1002

Introductory Astronomy II – Stars and Galaxies (4 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

A study of astronomical objects located beyond our solar system. Topics to be covered include the structure and evolution of the stars, pulsars, black holes, gaseous nebulae, star clusters, galaxies, quasars and the structure of evolution of the Universe. Night observations of these types of objects will be made. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequisite: AST 1001. (NUMERICAL DATA) (CORE: NATURAL SCIENCES) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)