Local to Global - 6 or 9 hours

Democracy and Personal Life

Globalization is reshaping our lives. A strong but often overlooked consequence of the dramatic social changes brought about by globalization and democratization centers on personal life. The rise of modern global and democratic societies has fundamentally changed the contours of all human interactions—including romantic relationships, family structures, sexuality, emotions, religion, ethical decisions, use of technology, perceptions of risk, and lifestyle choices.

COM 2112

Online Public Discourse (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

Examination of the effects of Internet-based communication tools on issue awareness, formulation of perspectives, and exchange of views.

ENG 2130 (LS)

Ethnic American Literature (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A study of major ethnic American literature, with a particular focus on Latino American, Asian American, and/or American Indian writers.

PS 1200

Current Political Issues (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A study of the current political issues and problems facing the national government. Problems in such areas as labor, education, the economy, agriculture, equal rights, foreign relations and national security will be analyzed. Not open to students with credit for PS 1201.

SOC 1110

Sociology of Intimate Relationships (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

Sociological perspectives and knowledge concerning intimate relationships, marriage, and family life in American society. General topics include marriage and marital relations; the family as a social institution; intimacy and love; sex, sexuality, and sexual relations; gender relations; singlehood; family dynamics; parenthood and child rearing; family crisis, conflict, and change; and marital separation, divorce, and remarriage.

WS 2600

Introduction to LGBT Studies (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

This course will provide a multi-disciplinary introduction to the study of historical, cultural, political and theoretical issues relevant to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals and communities and their allies.

SOC 1530

Selected Topics ( credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

Empire, Colonialism, and Globalization

The formation, growth and power of empires, their colonial regimes (driven to the far reaches of their worlds by appetites for wealth, resources, and human labor), and globalization are intimately linked. Courses in this theme could include prehistoric, ancient and/or modern empires, the hegemony exercised through far reaching colonial practices, and post-colonial consequences in globalization.

ART 2130 (FA)

Art from 1400 to the Present (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A global survey of art history from 1400 to the present examining the later artistic traditions of Europe, Asia, Africa, Oceania and the Americas. The course focuses on visual art and art making in light of changing social, political, religious, and cultural circumstances. Lecture three hours. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

ANT 1415

Understanding Culture (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course explores the diversity and unity of human experience through the lens of cultural anthropology. Using case studies and other texts, students will gain familiarity with different cultural worlds. As they do so, they will be asked to think critically about their own cultural ideas and actions, to reflect on problems facing humanity in the contemporary world, and to understand the various ways in which they are historically and socially connected to other people in other places. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

ENG 2040 (LS)

World Literature (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

World literature from the seventeenth century to the present, read in English. (WRITING; MULTICULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

HIS 1400 (HS)

World Empires (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course investigates how systems of power functioned on a global scale in the past. Students will discover, discuss, and write about how those systems came to be as well as what kind of society, culture, and world they have created. Students will also develop a clearer understanding not only of their individual role in such global interactions, but how events in one distant part of the world affect many other people around the globe. NOTE: HIS 1400 DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A HISTORY MAJOR OR MINOR. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

HIS/MSL 3823 (HS)

American Military History (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

This course explores the American military experience from its origins in the colonial period to the present day. It is designed to view military history from a variety of angles, through multiple perspectives and formats, and to broaden students' views of the American military establishment. We will examine traditional military topics, such as strategy and tactics, and combat operations, as well as exploring "new military history" topics, such as the interaction between war and society, civil-military relations, and the social history of soldiers. We will also explore how political, social, and cultural factors have influenced the nature of warfare and the military institution in American history.

GLS 2000

Contemporary Global Issues (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course examines a selection of global issues from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. Students will be exposed to the complexities of these issues, which are the result of the confluence of historical, geographical, economic, cultural, and political factors. Emphasis will be placed on how different societies view global issues, as well as how different perspectives can alter one's understanding of them. (MULTICULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY)

Global Resources

Basic requirements for human survival include food, water, shelter, and energy. These resources are globally distributed, and increasingly the acquisition of these commodities impacts, and indeed defines, local and international relationships, economically, environmentally, and politically. This theme explores geographical distributions of these resources, ways in which access to and use of resources shapes local and international relationships, technical systems that enable us to recover and use resources.

ECO 2620

Environmental and Resource Economics (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

The course explores the efficient allocation of environmental and natural resources and examines the continuing conflict between economic activity and environmental quality and the conservation of natural resources. The course applies economic theory to local, regional, national, and international environmental issues.

NUT 2351

Global Nutrition: Emerging Health Challenges (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course will examine global nutritional issues as they pertain to health and incidence of disease, integrating social, biological, political, economic, and environmental factors. The relationship of nutrition and global health to diverse aspects of globalization and economic development will be explored. Specific issues include hunger and obesity, infant mortality and elder health, nutritional programs and agencies, local to global food markets, and meat versus plant food sources. Students will gain the ability to accurately evaluate the food and health issues of a specific country or region. Lecture three hours.

TEC 2601 (formerly TEC 3601)

Energy Issues and Technology (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course will explore the various forms of energy and will examine the complete range of energy alternatives existing in the world today. Students will examine energy resources and their economic and environmental impacts. Students will also have the opportunity to learn about the concepts, tools, techniques, and materials needed to design and construct systems that are used to produce energy. The course consists of three major sections: principles of power and energy, conventional energy resources, and renewable energy resources. Students will study how to measure energy resources and estimate the power that could be produced from them, as well as the technological options that exist for transforming these resources into useful sources of energy. Lecture three hours. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

IDS 3010

H2O: We are Water (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

Water is studied in disciplines ranging from art to zoology. The hydrologic cycle functions on a global scale but has local impacts. This interdisciplinary course will look at water policy and how we manage water resources; who gets water, for what purpose; and the impacts of these decisions on the resource. It will discuss the ways we use water, abuse it, revere it, ignore it, and fight over it. In the US, our quality of life is entirely dependent on cheap, plentiful, clean water. We use it in vast quantities to produce power, grow food, and protect our health. Globally, demands for water continue to increase. The class will cover the intersections among our scientific understanding of water flows, our technological developments, and our policy approaches toward this elemental resource, locally and globally.

GHY 1020

World Regional Geography (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

The study of our contemporary world divided into the regions of North America, Central and South America, Africa, the Middle East, Europe, the Russian Realm, and South, East and Southeast Asia. Examination of global issues including population problems, technology and culture change, rural versus urban development, resource exportation and international trade, political identity and international conflict. (MULTICULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

Identity, Culture and Media

Whether hand crafted, machine made, digital or internet based, media of all sorts make up a vital dimension of global culture. Courses in this theme could examine how the folk arts, the fine arts and/or the mass media shape global discourse and personal identity.

ENG 2170

Introduction to Film (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A critical examination of notable examples of the filmmaker's art from silent movies up to the modern era, including a variety of film genres and including both American and foreign films. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

ART 2011 (FA)

Introduction to Visual Arts (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course covers selected historical and contemporary issues, the formal structure and critical analysis of the visual arts and an examination of art's relationship to ideas, beliefs and culture. Students will develop a critical understanding of art as a manifestation of broader social, historical, and contemporary issues in a global context. Lecture three hours. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

PHL 1503

Everyday Philosophy: Local to Global (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An introduction to special problems, topics, or issues in philosophy regarding cultural diversity and the interrelationship between the local and the global. The subject matter of this course will vary. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

MUS 2018 (FA)

Introduction to World Music (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A survey of musics representing international cultures. Emphasis is placed on the role of music in various life experiences. Lecture three hours. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

COM 3130

Minorities in Media (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

This lecture and discussion course introduces students to the complex relationships between race, gender, and popular culture via critical media analysis.

REL 1100

Religion and Contemporary Issues (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

This course examines the relationship between religion and the issues that confront our world. Through the exploration of writings of religious significance and other material and media artifacts (art, architecture, music, media, political rhetoric, film, etc.), the course considers how cultural and social influences shape religious expression and contribute to religion as a force in contemporary life both locally and globally.

COM 3531

Mass Media & Society ( credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

MUS 2615 (FA)

Music and Propaganda (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring
  • Alternate Years

This course is designed to examine ways in which music has historically been used internationally to enhance/intensify various aural and visual forms of propaganda. Although specific cases such as those in Nazi Germany, Communist China, and the Soviet Union are explored, the broader scope of the course also addresses the concepts of patriotism, promotion, protest, and manipulation.

MUS 2616 (FA)

Cuban Music and Culture (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring
  • Alternate Years

This course is designed to explore the music of Cuba as it has both reflected and shaped culture throughout Cuban history from the pre-Columbian era to the early twenty-first century. Of particular interest is the evolution of Cuban music during the twentieth century as it was appropriated and propagandized for economic and political purposes, as well as the development of Cuban music video accessible via the internet.

Investigations: Global

An experiential, interdisciplinary study in the humanities and social sciences of significant global issues (historical, economic, social, cultural, ideological, aesthetic) and their relationships with local, regional, and national issues.

This course is available only to Watauga Global Community students.

WGC 1104

Investigations: Global (6 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

Priority enrollment given to Watauga Global Community students.

An experiential, interdisciplinary study in the humanities and social sciences of significant global issues (historical, economic, social, cultural, ideological, aesthetic) and their relationships with local, regional, and national issues.

Origins and Migrations

Human prehistory/history is marked by the impacts of migrations. Whether compelled or drawn beyond their places of origin, migrants have challenged borders through conquest, colonialism, post-colonialism, exploitation, assimilation, and adaptation. As laborers, kin, refugees, and conquerors, they have spread technologies, ideologies, philosophies, and aesthetics.

GLS 2000

Contemporary Global Issues (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course examines a selection of global issues from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. Students will be exposed to the complexities of these issues, which are the result of the confluence of historical, geographical, economic, cultural, and political factors. Emphasis will be placed on how different societies view global issues, as well as how different perspectives can alter one's understanding of them. (MULTICULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY)

HIS 1600 (HS)

Migration in World History (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course examines the role of human migration in world history. Starting with "peopling the planet" and using topics such as language diversity, diaspora, colonization and immigration, students will explore the dispersal of people, plants, animals, diseases, as well as cultural and technological diffusion. The emphasis is on evaluation of primary and secondary sources, development of analytical skills, and application of methods used in comparative histories clustered around these themes. Students have a semester long project of preparing their own family history that entails using data bases, oral interviews, and narrative writing that puts their own "local" history into the "global" context of the main events of the past century. NOTE: HIS 1600 DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A HISTORY MAJOR OR MINOR. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

FCS 2103

Family Development: Origins and Movement (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A study, using the multicultural life span approach, of factors affecting human and family development. Theories, patterns, structures and functions of diverse family groupings and interactions and interrelationships in family processes and development will be considered in relation to current research. Students will research their individual family origins and movement over time to understand the current change in ethnic diversity. Students will also study and analyze critical family issues and compare these issues within different cultures in the United States and around the world. Lecture three hours. (COMPUTER) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

ENG 2030 (LS)

World Literature (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

World literature in translation from its beginnings to the seventeenth century. (WRITING; MULTICULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

Regions in Global Context

The region is a fundamental concept for understanding ideas and issues at a variety of scales from neighborhoods to counties to intergovernmental organizations and the global community. Criteria for defining a region can include physical or environmental conditions, cultural characteristics, political boundaries or connections between particular places. The Regions in a Global Context theme examines the interconnections between communities both near and far. Courses under this theme contribute to the global awareness of students and enable them to more fully participate in democratic institutions as informed and globally aware citizens.

ENG 2040 (LS)

World Literature (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

World literature from the seventeenth century to the present, read in English. (WRITING; MULTICULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

GHY 1020

World Regional Geography (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

The study of our contemporary world divided into the regions of North America, Central and South America, Africa, the Middle East, Europe, the Russian Realm, and South, East and Southeast Asia. Examination of global issues including population problems, technology and culture change, rural versus urban development, resource exportation and international trade, political identity and international conflict. (MULTICULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

HIS 1130 (HS)

Themes in Global History (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An examination of selected themes in global history with an emphasis on the historical context of global issues, processes, trends, and systems as they have affected local regions. NOTE: HIS 1130 DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A HISTORY MAJOR OR MINOR. (MULTICULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

ARB/CHN/FRE/GER/JPN/POR/RSN/SNH 1050

Intermediate Language (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

A continuation of CHN/FRE/GER/JPN/RSN/SNH 1040. Focus on various aspects of culture, society, literature, traditions, and daily preoccupations with continued development of communicative language skills. Reinforcement, expansion, and synthesis of concepts of language and culture through contact with authentic materials. Prerequisite: CHN/FRE/GER/JPN/RSN/SNH 1030 or CHN/FRE/GER/JPN/RSN/SNH 1040, or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

FRE/GER/SNH 1060*

Accelerated Intermediate French/German/Spanish (6 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

Combines FRE/GER/SNH 1040 and FRE 1050. Prerequisite: FRE/GER/SNH 1020 or the equivalent. Class meets daily for a total of 300 minutes per week. Laboratory work required. (MULTI -CULT URAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

*6 s.h. classes, but only 3 s.h. count toward Gen Ed.

HIS 1520 (HS)

Honors: Patterns of Global History (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An honors course examining selected themes in global history with an emphasis on the historical context of global issues, processes, trends, and systems as they have affected local regions. HIS 1520 cannot be repeated for credit and does not count toward the requirements for a History major or minor. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

HIS 1525 (HS)

Honors: Problems in Global History (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An in-depth examination of selected events, issues, systems, processes, or developments in global history, and their relationship to and effect upon local regions. Particular emphasis will be given to development of critical thinking skills appropriate to historical inquiry. HIS 1525 cannot be repeated for credit and does not count toward the requirements for a History major or minor.

RM 2140 (HS)

Natural Resources: Becoming an Informed Citizen (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

Through the lens of outdoor recreation, this course will examine natural resources to help shape a more
informed citizen. Students will examine dealings with natural resources by looking at how humans value
and define ownership of them, as well as look at natural and outdoor recreation resource management
practices and why they can be controversial or problematic. In addition, this course will look at how
citizens become involved in the politics of natural and outdoor recreation resources.

Performance of Culture

This theme explores the links between performance and culture through diverse perspectives and forms of expression. Culture and performance are learned and are reflexive, shaping and shaped by each other. Rituals, both public and private, enact culture and may take the form of performance. Public performances and performing arts enact culture in myriad forms, serving as cultural markers.

FRE/GER/SNH 1060*

Accelerated Intermediate French/German/Spanish (6 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

Combines FRE/GER/SNH 1040 and FRE 1050. Prerequisite: FRE/GER/SNH 1020 or the equivalent. Class meets daily for a total of 300 minutes per week. Laboratory work required. (MULTI -CULT URAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

*6 s.h. classes, but only 3 s.h. count toward Gen Ed.

DAN 2020 (FA)

World Dance (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

This course will explore dance as a vital contribution to cultural understanding from various regions and cultures around the world including the Americas, Africa, Europe, Asia and Oceania.

THR 2020 (FA)

World Culture and Performance Studies (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

This course applies insights from performance art, theatre, dance and other art forms. Its interdisciplinary approach will allow students to have the opportunities to study the unique role of "performance" in various aspects of our society as well as the world today. The class will explore the concept of performance, and special attention will be paid to issues of multiculturalism and the cultural, political, historical, social, economic and technological contexts of performance studies.

DAN 2030 (FA)

Dance, Media and Culture (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

This course will focus on the intersection of dance, media and culture by contextualizing an emerging role of dance from an elitist perspective to a populist activity. Content will include a global perspective of dance on film, technological advances in digital dance media and the creation of fusion dance forms as a means of cultural expression.

MUS 2018 (FA)

Introduction to World Music (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A survey of musics representing international cultures. Emphasis is placed on the role of music in various life experiences. Lecture three hours. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

COM 3535

Intercultural Communication ( credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

ARB/CHN/FRE/GER/JPN/POR/RSN/SNH 1050

Intermediate Language (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

A continuation of CHN/FRE/GER/JPN/RSN/SNH 1040. Focus on various aspects of culture, society, literature, traditions, and daily preoccupations with continued development of communicative language skills. Reinforcement, expansion, and synthesis of concepts of language and culture through contact with authentic materials. Prerequisite: CHN/FRE/GER/JPN/RSN/SNH 1030 or CHN/FRE/GER/JPN/RSN/SNH 1040, or the equivalent. Laboratory work required. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

Sustainability and Global Change

Sustainability involves meeting basic human needs without undermining human communities, culture, or natural environments. This difficult goal requires recognition of the complex interrelationships among environmental, economic, and social forces and reexamination of our relationships to technology, natural resources, natural science, human development and/or local to global politics. Topics could include climate change and environmental pollution, economic globalization, north-south disparity, local and global strategies, agriculture and sustainable food production, environmental ethics and history, and social justice.

SD 2400

Principles of Sustainable Development (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course is the foundation course for students interested in pursuing a major or a minor in Sustainable Development. The course will introduce students to the concepts and history of "development," the origins of concerns about "sustainability," and the marriage of these two ideas in the contested notion of "sustainable development (SD)." From that basis, the course will then examine the understanding and use of SD principles in and from various disciplinary and multi/interdisciplinary perspectives. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY)

PHL 2015

Environmental Ethics (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course is an introduction to ethical dimensions of environmental issues. Students will have the opportunity to study theoretical perspectives such as deep ecology, ecofeminism, Native American views of the land, and social ecology. The course will also consider environmental ethical issues such as the moral status of nature, pesticide use, environmental racism, the treatment of animals, deforestation, world population growth, and what it means to live an ecologically responsible life. (WRITING; MULTICULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

PHY 1830

The Physical Principles of Energy and Sustainability (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An introduction to the physical principles governing energy and renewable technologies. Topics will include: thermal, geothermal, electrical, magnetic, wind, solar, hydroelectric, nuclear, and other sources of energy as well as other sustainable technologies such as conservation of material resources. PHY 1830 is not open to students who have credit for PHY 1102.

FCS 2110

Global Awareness: Examining the Human Condition (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A human ecological approach to the issues related to hunger, child and maternal mortality, access to primary education, and reproductive health. Economic, social, political, and geographic concepts will be related to current indicators of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals in order to analyze impacts on individuals and families. Students will develop and evaluate strategies that enhance living conditions for families in local and global contexts. Emphasis will be directed toward families most affected by negative living conditions. Lecture three hours.

TEC 2029

Society and Technology (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the symbiotic relationship between technology and society. Examples of these relationships will be taken from historical accounts and from analyses of contemporary societies both in industrialized and non- industrialized countries. Lecture three hours. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

GHY 1010

Introduction to Physical Geography (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A comprehensive study of our physical earth emphasizing the distributional patterns and inter-relatedness of its land, soils, natural vegetation and habitat, and weather and climate. Examinations of environmental issues including hazardous wastes, acid rain, floods, droughts, deforestation and air pollution. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

FER 1000

Principles of Fermentation Sciences (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

Principles of fermentation sciences will cover the history, culture, and fundamental science of the fermentation processes; basic food science, microbiology, chemistry, biology, natural products chemistry and nutrition. FER 1000 will introduce concepts relating to the cultivation of grapes, grains and hops utilized in the fermentation industry. Students will be exposed to the basic methods and principles behind the fermentation process including production of cheese, bread, vegetables, meats, beer, wine, bio-fuels and distilled products.