Historical & Social - 6 or 9 hours

Ancient Worlds

This theme explores a diverse range of prehistoric, ancient, and pre-modern peoples, the history and culture of such societies, and the methods and evidence used to study them.

REL 2010 (LS)

Biblical Literature: The Hebrew Scriptures (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An analysis of Old Testament literature as the product of the life of the Hebrew people, students will have the opportunity to examine selected documents in terms of their literary structure, historical context, and religious perspective. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

HIS 2312 (HS)

Introduction to the Ancient Mediterranean World (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Even-Numbered Years

A survey of the Ancient Mediterranean, including Greece, the Hellenistic World, and Rome. Topics covered will include ancient art, philosophy, religion, and literature. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

ART 2030 (FA)

Art from Prehistory to 1400 (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A global survey of art history focusing on the early visual artistic traditions of Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas from the dawn of art to 1400. The course examines visual art and art making in religious, social, cultural, and political contexts. Lecture three hours. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

ANT 1420

Archaeology and the Human Past (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An introduction to the human past through the scientific process of archaeology. Controversial issues discussed may include human evolution, the fate of the Neandertals, peopling of the Americas, and the cycling of state level societies. Ultimately, lessons from the past are considered in light of contemporary human issues. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

Appalachia: Life, Culture, and Land

This theme examines the natural environment, culture, society, and human identity in the Appalachian region with an eye toward understanding its unique qualities as well as its place within the nation and larger world.

AS 2411

Appalachia: An Introduction (Social Sciences) (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

This course explores the Appalachian region from a cross-disciplinary perspective, with readings on Appalachia drawn primarily from the social sciences. Both historical and contemporary issues are examined, focusing upon national and international as well as local and regional contexts. This courses provides an introduction to the Bachelor of Arts degree in Appalachian Studies and to the undergraduate minor in Appalachian Studies. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

AS 2200 (LS)

Appalachian Stories (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

Introduction to the literature of Appalachia with an emphasis on the multiplicity of narrative forms in the region. This course examines both historical and contemporary Appalachian literary expression as well as local, regional, national, and international perspectives on the literature of the region. Students read and study oral narratives, exploration narratives, travel writing, memoir, autobiography, song lyrics, and nature writing, in addition to fiction, poetry, and drama. The course also explores how literary production comments on and participates in the construction of Appalachia.

COM 3118

Communicating Coal in Appalachia (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

The course examines the types of communication and information campaigns used by various stakeholders in the cultural, economic and political conflicts surrounding the coal industry in Appalachia. Students will learn through case studies, readings, guest speakers and at least one field trip to the coal fields of Appalachia.

AS/GLY 2301

The History of Coal from the Pennsylvanian to the Present (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

Coal has played a critical role in the history of the southern Appalachians. The geologic processes that formed coal and shaped the landscape into the steep ridges and hollows of the Appalachian coalfields have directly affected the human history of the region – from hunting in pre-colonial times, to settlement and subsistence farming in the 1800s, to mining and unionization in the 1900s, to mountaintop removal and natural gas/coalbed methane extraction in the last decade. This course covers the physical and chemical processes that form coal as well as the tectonic and geomorphologic processes that formed the landscape of the coalfields and shaped the agricultural practices of the early settlers. It examines the cultural history of coal mining and life in the company-owned coal camps and the political history of unionization through literature and film. The economics and environmental consequences of coal-fired power plants are discussed, and the environmental and occupational hazards associated with both underground and surface coal mining are analyzed from both a scientific and a sociological perspective. (Same as AS 2301.)

SOC 3710

Sociology of Appalachian Communities (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

This course examines Appalachian communities from a sociological perspective, with a focus on how the region gives rise to a unique configuration of cultural, institutional, and other social practices. Specific attention is also given to the differences between urban and rural Appalachian communities, as well as the complex relationships Appalachia has with the broader component of American society.

HIS 3726 (HS)

History of the Appalachian Region (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

GEN ED: Historical Studies Designation; Historical and Social Perspective (Theme: "Appalachia") A survey of the history of the Appalachian region from the period of exploration and settlement to the present. (WRITING)

AS/MUS 2016 (FA)

Appalachian Music (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A survey of Appalachian music including both instrumental and vocal styles, older traditions and newer regional forms. Students will have opportunities to develop musical skills through hands-on class projects and activities. Lecture three hours. (Same as AS 2016.) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

Cultural Diversity

Examines the nature of culture and the diverse ways in which societies make meaning and are organized across time and space. Topics include cultural and religious values and beliefs, modern historical influences on cultural variation, and the impact of gender, ethnicity, and inequality on the cultural experience.

SOC 4560

Race and Minority Relations (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

GEN ED: Historical and Social Perspective (Theme: "Cultural Diversity") Examination of intergroup relations, including racial, ethnic, and women's issues; the bases of conflict, accommodation, and assimilation; the nature and consequences of prejudice and discrimination; evaluation of proposals for reduction or elimination of prejudice and discrimination. (MULTI-CULTURAL) [Dual-listed with SOC 5560.]

HIS 1120 (HS)

Society and History (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An examination of selected themes in world or regional history with an emphasis on the historical context of various social, political, cultural, and economic processes. NOTE: HIS 1120 DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A HISTORY MAJOR OR MINOR. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

GHY 1040

Introduction to Human Geography (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

This course examines the spatial patterns of human society. By focusing on the description and analysis of the spatial dimensions of human language, economy, religion and government, this course is a celebration of human diversity. Lectures, readings, films, slides, writing exercises, map quizzes and class discussions will help the student to understand and appreciate the geography of the human mosaic. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

WS 2421

Sex, Gender, and Power: Introduction to Women's Studies for the Social Sciences (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

This course will provide an introduction to the study of gender and a diversity of women, both historic and contemporary, using a variety of methodologies and materials drawn primarily from the social sciences. It will also serve as an introduction to the interdisciplinary discipline of Women's Studies for the major and the minor in Women's Studies. Students who take WS 2421 cannot take WS 2420 for credit. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

MUS 2023 (FA)

Music and Gender (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

An investigation of the social constructions of gender and how they are reflected in music. Topics will include how gender constructions operate in compositional, performance and teaching practices.

ART 2011 (FA)

Introduction to Visual Arts (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course covers selected historical and contemporary issues, the formal structure and critical analysis of the visual arts and an examination of art's relationship to ideas, beliefs and culture. Students will develop a critical understanding of art as a manifestation of broader social, historical, and contemporary issues in a global context. Lecture three hours. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

REL 1110

Religions of the World (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course introduces the major living religions of the world. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

ANT 1415

Understanding Culture (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course explores the diversity and unity of human experience through the lens of cultural anthropology. Using case studies and other texts, students will gain familiarity with different cultural worlds. As they do so, they will be asked to think critically about their own cultural ideas and actions, to reflect on problems facing humanity in the contemporary world, and to understand the various ways in which they are historically and socially connected to other people in other places. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

Individual and Society

Focuses on relationships between the individual and society; examines both the biological and cognitive foundations of individual behavior and the cultural forces that influence personal experience. Emphasis is on how individuals simultaneously shape and are shaped by diverse group, organizational, and social contexts.

PSY 1200

Psychology: Historical, Social, and Scientific Foundations (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course will focus on the biological and cognitive foundations of individual behavior, as well as the individual in the social context. Research on psychological phenomena will be reviewed to demonstrate the logic of the scientific method, to foster critical thinking, to identify potential shortcomings in interpretations of behavior (e.g., claims presented in the popular media), and to describe linkages to everyday experiences (e.g., aesthetic and perceptual judgments, improved studying, friendship and attraction, and development of political attitudes). Students will have the opportunity to learn how to use empirical data to draw sound conclusions about behavior. Finally, connections to other thematic areas of scholarly inquiry within other disciplines will be presented. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

SOC 1000

The Sociological Perspective (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course applies the sociological perspective to the experience of individuals within differing social contexts, ranging from interpersonal interactions and small groups to larger organizations and the broader society. Relationships between individuals and their societies are examined with respect to a variety of issues, including socialization processes and cultural diversity; the nature of gender, racial, and other social identities; and institutional settings ranging from the family to the economy and government. Required for majors and minors. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

PHL 2000

Philosophy, Society, and Ethics (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An introduction to ethical reasoning and an examination of moral problems in contemporary social issues. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

FCS 2111

Social History of the Family (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course will examine family as an institution through cross-cultural, social, and historical contexts. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an introduction to theoretical perspectives used in the study of families, knowledge of the history of family life, and learning experiences that provide opportunities to think critically, communicate intelligently, and make informed opinions about contemporary family issues. Connections to other courses within the individual and society theme will focus on individual and group decision making within the context of the family. Lecture three hours.

ANT 2420

Gender, Race and Class (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An anthropological study of gender, social class, ethnicity, race and sexuality as cultural categories with a variety of meanings. Systems of inequality and the ways in which these categories are used to limit access to economic wealth, power, and prestige are analyzed in a global context. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

WS 2400

Distinguished Lectures on Women, Sex, and Gender (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

This course introduces students to a variety of topics and methods of investigation in the study of women's and gender issues. Featuring a variety of lectures from multiple disciplines, this course stresses the importance of taking women and gender seriously for understanding a variety of topics. Students will also interpret and analyze the lectures through regular meetings with an instructor, who also designs assignments and readings around each lecture topic. (MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY)

RM 2100

Leisure in Society (3 credit hours)

This course focuses on relationships between the individual and society in the context of leisure. It examines both the biological and cognitive foundations of individual leisure behavior and the cultural forces that influence personal experience. Emphasis is on how an individual's leisure simultaneously shapes and is shaped by diverse group, organizational and social contexts.

ENG 2120 (LS)

African-American Literature (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A critical study of the work of outstanding African-American writers. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE:HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

Mind

Explores theoretical questions concerning the nature of the mind, knowledge, and mental phenomena. Examines the nature of knowledge, creativity, the concept of "truth," as well as theories of the mind from biological, philosophical, anthropological, perceptual, social, developmental and experimental perspectives. Considers the social, cultural, theoretical, and political pressures that contribute to our understanding of the mind.

PSY 1200

Psychology: Historical, Social, and Scientific Foundations (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course will focus on the biological and cognitive foundations of individual behavior, as well as the individual in the social context. Research on psychological phenomena will be reviewed to demonstrate the logic of the scientific method, to foster critical thinking, to identify potential shortcomings in interpretations of behavior (e.g., claims presented in the popular media), and to describe linkages to everyday experiences (e.g., aesthetic and perceptual judgments, improved studying, friendship and attraction, and development of political attitudes). Students will have the opportunity to learn how to use empirical data to draw sound conclusions about behavior. Finally, connections to other thematic areas of scholarly inquiry within other disciplines will be presented. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

IDS 3260

Creativity: An Introduction (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

An interdisciplinary and cross-cultural investigation of creativity as an individual, social, cultural, and natural phenomenon. Although often associated with artistry, creativity contributes to the development of all academic and professional disciplines and is an important component in non-academic culture and in individual life. The concept of creativity has deep roots in Western culture (going back at least to Augustine), and the cross disciplinary study of creativity has burgeoned in the United States since WWII. The class will explore: the history of the concept of creativity; creativity and self-fulfillment; psychological, anthropological, and sociological theories of creativity; practices claiming to enhance creativity; and case studies of creative individuals and creative breakthroughs.

LLC 2050 (formerly FL 2050)

Say What? Language in Mind and Society (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An exploration of the issues surrounding human language and its relationship with thought, cognition and culture. Students will have the opportunity to learn how the sounds, structures and meanings of human languages are produced and interpreted, and will explore variation among world languages as well as the relationship among language, society, and culture. Different theoretical approaches to these issues will be explained. The course will also examine the interaction between language and mind and the neurological basis of human language, and will look at the application of linguistic principles in language learning and artificial intelligence.

PHL 1501

Everyday Philosophy: Historical and Social Perspectives (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An introduction to special problems, topics, or issues in philosophy from historical and social perspectives. The subject matter of this course will vary. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

HIS 3923 (HS)

The Truth in History and the Truth of History (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

The primary goal of this course is to help students understand how historians determine the truth in history. The class will use the example of a specific historical event. Students will examine reasoned arguments about truth, relevant social theories necessary for understanding social processes, and primary and secondary sources about the event in question. The class will integrate these materials to explore how historians determine the truth in history and the truth of history.

Religion, Myth and Society

This theme explores relationships between people and their belief systems, including the ways in which humans have employed such beliefs to give meaning to their world. Emphasis is on diversity and the many varieties of faith and belief.

REL 1110

Religions of the World (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course introduces the major living religions of the world. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

IDS 3261

Sustainability, Religion, Spirituality (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

Debate has raged among scholars, activists, and members of religious communities about the role(s) of religion and of specific religions in fostering unsustainability and in achieving sustainability. As part of this debate, some have proposed the existence and importance of a spirituality unconnected with historical or new religions as a key component of moving toward sustainability. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to these questions both in their historical and contemporary forms.

THR 3730

Early Theatre History and Literature (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

This course explores the history, literature, and criticism of the theatre from prehistory up to the Early Modern period. The course will focus predominantly on European theatre, but will also include studies of some Asian forms. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

ANT 2430

Magic, Witchcraft and Religion (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A cross-cultural study of the nature and functions of belief systems. Emphasis is placed on understanding the belief systems of non-Western cultures in order to provide a means through which our own beliefs can be better understood. A variety of anthropological and psychological approaches to the study of belief systems are utilized. (MULTI-CULTURAL)

ART 2030 (FA)

Art from Prehistory to 1400 (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A global survey of art history focusing on the early visual artistic traditions of Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas from the dawn of art to 1400. The course examines visual art and art making in religious, social, cultural, and political contexts. Lecture three hours. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

WGC 3301 (FA)

Junior Seminar: Natives of the Southwest: A Walk in Beauty (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

Revolutions And Social Change

This theme examines the critical role of political, social, and cultural revolutions in bringing change to human society. Emphasis is on the origins and effects of revolutions over time.

SOC 1100

Social Problems in American Society (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A survey course which examines the major social problems in America today, such as poverty, racism, sexism, aging, militarism and war, environmental abuse, crime, mental illness, drug abuse and alcoholism. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

HIS 1501 (HS)

Revolution and Social Change in World History (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course provides an analysis of significant revolutions and social movements in world history. These may be defined as political, social, cultural, scientific and technological. This course examines the events of these movements, as well as the philosophical/ideological ideas that shaped them. It also examines how these revolutions affected societies in a local and global context, and how they continue to affect the world in which we live today. NOTE: HIS 1501 DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A HISTORY MAJOR OR MINOR. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

PHL 3030

Feminist Philosophy (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

This course examines conceptual and normative issues in contemporary feminist theory. Issues to be discussed include power and the production of knowledge, resistance, violence against women, sex and gender, the interrelatedness of gender, race, class, and sexuality, body image, the personal as political, and the relation between feminist theory and activism. The class also considers western and non-western feminist discussion of these themes. The goal is for each student to gain an appreciation of the diversity and complexity of feminist thought, as well as insight concerning the relation between women's experiences and feminist theorizing. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL)

REL 2120

Christianity (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

An exploration of Christianity from the early period through the Enlightenment and rise of contemporary Christian movements, students will explore the history of the church, its doctrinal emphases, and its practice in a variety of locations and time periods. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

MUS 2015 (FA)

History of Rock Music (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

Study of musical groups, soloists and styles related to the evolution of this genre, and on related social, historic and political events. Rock music from the early 1950s through significant developments of the late 1970s. Lecture three hours. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

IDS 2200 (HS)

Race and Resistance: Perspectives on African Americans in the Jim Crow South (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

Race remains one of America's central organizing principles. This course will explore how African Americans in the South, following the Civil War, struggled against white supremacy in their politics and in their culture, in the process creating perhaps our nation's most successful non-violent campaign for social change, the Civil Rights Movement. To do this, we will explore the African American experience from a variety of disciplinary perspectives: scholars from different disciplines, students will come to understand, can approach the past very differently. Students will also become acquainted with popular aspects of African American culture, such as jazz, blues, dance, religion and food. During the course of the semester, students will design their own research projects, integrating knowledge drawn from a variety of disciplinary approaches and methods, presenting their research in both written form and other media.

COM 3532

Integrated Communication ( credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

This American Life

With a focus on the foundations of civic education, this theme leads to an understanding of how the American people created and developed their democratic institutions and social processes; how marginalized groups within the American framework have sought and won access to civic life; and how Americans have expressed their social and individual conscience to shape their identity and place within the world.

HIS 1200 (HS)

American History (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course will acquaint the student with the major developments of American history from pre-contact to post-modern eras. Emphasis will be given to the foundational political experiences of the American people and how political developments have been influenced and affected by social developments. Students will learn to apply analytical skills to the reading of primary texts representing the whole sweep of American history. Written expression will be emphasized. NOTE: HIS 1200 DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A HISTORY MAJOR OR MINOR. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

ENG 2350 (LS)

Studies in American Literature (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A study of major works of American literature. Course content will vary and may concentrate on poetry, fiction, drama, or a combination. Prerequisite: ENG 1000.

ECO 2030

Principles of Economics - Price Theory (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A brief introduction to the study of economics followed by an in-depth analysis of microeconomics, including: the price mechanism and supply and demand analysis; consumer choice; cost and revenue analysis of the firm; market structures; factor markets and income distribution; market failure and the role of government; and current economic problems such as pollution, poverty and discrimination. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

PS 1100

American National Government and Politics (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A study of the development and operation of the American national government, its powers, organization and policies. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

PS 3722

America in the World (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

The course provides students with the foundation to understand the historical and contemporary practice of U.S. foreign policy and familiarizes them with patterns of continuity and change in U.S. foreign policy. (WRITING; SPEAKING)

SW 2020

The American Social Welfare System (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An introduction to social welfare as a concept and as a social institution: overview of the public and private network of social programs and services intended to help fulfill basic human needs. Analysis of major social issues, problems, and values which shape social policy and the distribution of resources in the U.S., with attention to several other nations. Visit to human service agency required. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

MUS 2014 (FA)

Jazz Music in American Society (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

Jazz may be the United States' only original contribution to music. Due to its comparatively recent emergence as a recognized art form, a great deal of confusion exists as to the meaning, origins, development, and the place of jazz relative to other areas of music. This course will define jazz as precisely as possible and show its evolution in the historical background of the United States. Lecture three hours.

IDS 2000

This Grand Experiment: An Introduction to American Studies (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

Since the 1930s, scholars have been studying the core values and ideas that define American (U.S.) culture. American Studies scholars integrate ideas and methods from a diverse array of disciplines in examining what it is that makes this place and its people "American." In this course, students will review the roots of American Studies and the concepts of exceptionalism, multiculturalism, and transnationalism, which have characterized how U.S. culture is perceived both here and abroad. Embedded in these concepts are physical, economic, political, and demographic characteristics that have historically and continue to define "America."

Capitalism and Its Critics

Capitalism had its critics before it even had a name. Yet capitalism has endured. And so has the criticism. While each course will provide its own unique perspective and areas of emphasis, all courses will address economics and economic systems; articulate the essential principles of free market capitalism; assess the underlying assumptions, constraints, and known limitations of market-based systems; and examine issues of market failure and theories of government regulation of markets.

FIN 2860

Personal Finance (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

A study of the key concepts, tools, and techniques of personal financial management. Focus is placed on the financial statements of the individual. The balance sheet model includes a discussion of personal assets - both financial and non- financial, personal liabilities including all types of loans, and personal net worth. The implications of the current financial environment (i.e., changing tax laws, savings instruments, interest rates, etc.) is also considered from the standpoint of the individual.

HIS 3524

World Economy: History and Theory (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Even-Numbered Years

This course traces the development of the world economy to the present, focusing on the search for the determinants of economic success and the various solutions that have been offered. The long term changes in world income and population are quantified (mainly for the second millennium), the forces that explain the success of rich countries are identified, and the obstacles that hindered economic advance in lagging regions are explored. We will emphasize the interaction between empirical methods and interdisciplinary theories. The interaction between wealthy nations and the rest of the world is scrutinized to assess the degree to which backwardness may have been due to Western policy. Also, special emphasis will be placed on the analysis of government spending patterns and the economic impact of conflicts.

MGT 3040

Child Labor in Global and Historical Perspectives (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

Child labor is a complex social and economic problem in the less-developed nations of the world today. Yet, we know of no industrially advanced nation that did not go through its own "dirty phase" of pervasive use of child labor. This course examines child labor from both historical and contemporary global perspectives.

PS 3410

Marxism (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

Explores the basic principles and features found within Marxist thought. This includes some discussions of Marx's immediate predecessors such as Hegel and Feuerbach in post-Marxist socialist and communist literature. (MULTI -CULT URAL; CROSS DISCIPLINARY )

ECO 2030

Principles of Economics - Price Theory (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A brief introduction to the study of economics followed by an in-depth analysis of microeconomics, including: the price mechanism and supply and demand analysis; consumer choice; cost and revenue analysis of the firm; market structures; factor markets and income distribution; market failure and the role of government; and current economic problems such as pollution, poverty and discrimination. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

Understanding Culture Through Social Practice

WGC 2100-2199

Tangents (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An experiential, interdisciplinary study in the humanities and/or social sciences of the historical, social, literary, cultural, and/or aesthetic perspectives of specific topics. Course content and topics will vary. (WRITING; SPEAKING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES/SOCIAL SCIENCES)

WGC 3100-3199

Junior Seminar (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An experiential, interdisciplinary study in the humanities and/or social sciences or natural sciences of the historical, social, literary, cultural, aesthetic, and systems analysis perspectives of specific topics. Course content and topics will vary. (WRITING; SPEAKING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES/SOCIAL SCIENCES)