Aesthetic - 6 or 9 hours

Traditions and Innovations

This theme would introduce students to traditions and innovations in forms of creative expression since approximately 1500. In the courses, students would be able to interpret those forms through various theoretical frameworks. In particular, students would understand how those forms change over time, both reflecting and shaping their social, religious, political, and intellectual contexts.

HIS 1110 (HS)

History and Culture (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An examination of selected themes in world or regional history with an emphasis on how products of creative expression have shaped, and been shaped by, their historical context. NOTE: HIS 1110 DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A HISTORY MAJOR OR MINOR. (MULTICULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

PHL 2013

Philosophy of Art (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

A course that concentrates on the interplay of art and philosophy in ancient through contemporary cultures. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

ENG 2050 (LS)

Studies in British Literature (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A study of major works of British Literature. Course content will vary and may concentrate on poetry, fiction, drama, or a combination. Prerequisite: ENG 1000.

MUS 2611 (HS)

Music History and Style I (2 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

An overview of the stylistic tendencies throughout Western music history and an examination of the development of Western notated music and musical style as revealed through studies of social influences, biographical figures, and notated musical scores from ancient times to the mid-seventeenth century. (MULTI -CULT URAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY ) (CORE: HUMANITIES/MUSIC MAJORS ONLY)

MUS 2612 (HS)

Music History and Style II (2 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

An examination of the development of Western notated music and musical style as revealed through studies of social influences,
biographical figures, and notated musical scores from the mid-seventeenth century to the mid-nineteenth century. (WRITING; MULTICULT
URAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY ) (CORE: HUMANITIES/MUSIC MAJORS ONLY )

MUS 3611 (HS)

Music History and Style III (2 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID)
An examination of the development of Western notated music and musical style as revealed through studies of social influences,
biographical figures, and notated musical scores from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL;
CROSS-DISCIPLINARY ) (CORE: HUMANITIES/MUSIC MAJORS ONLY )

ART 2130 (FA)

Art from 1400 to the Present (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A global survey of art history from 1400 to the present examining the later artistic traditions of Europe, Asia, Africa, Oceania and the Americas. The course focuses on visual art and art making in light of changing social, political, religious, and cultural circumstances. Lecture three hours. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

Analyzing Style and Form

The concepts of style and form are central to the study of creative expression. Courses in this theme would develop students' abilities to analyze forms of creative expression through a focus on structural studies of form and comparative analyses of various styles.

MUS 2011 (FA)

Analyzing Style and Form: Music (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A nontechnical course for students with little or no musical background. Emphasis is placed on the style and form of music as perceived by the listener. Lecture three hours. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

THR 2010 (FA)

Analyzing Style and Form: Theatre (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

In this course, students will analyze styles and forms of theatre from various cultures and historical eras. They will also examine how their own personal, historical, and cultural perspectives affect their responses to artistic performance.

DAN 2010 (FA)

Analyzing Style and Form: Dance (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course will explore the meaning, history, and aesthetics of dance. It will include cross cultural comparisons and the influence of other art forms throughout the history of dance. The course will be primarily lecture with demonstrations, video, and some experiential work.

PHL 2013

Philosophy of Art (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

A course that concentrates on the interplay of art and philosophy in ancient through contemporary cultures. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

Cultivating Creative Expression

In this theme, students could explore the creative process and the connection it has with cognitive, psychological, emotional, bodily/kinesthetic, aesthetic, and social development.

ART 2022 (FA)

Cultivating Creative Expression through Visual Art (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

Students will create works of visual art in various media, reflecting on the creative process, the influence of culture, and the dynamic and reciprocal interactions among the artist, instructor, and student. Lecture and studio four hours.

MUS 2022 (FA)

Cultivating Creative Expression Through Music (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

Students will create works of music using various media, reflecting on the creative process, the influence of culture, and the dynamic and reciprocal interactions among the artist, instructor, and student. Lecture/studio three hours.

THR 2022 (FA)

Cultivating Creative Expression Through Theatre (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

The emphasis in this course is on understanding and creating theatre as a springboard for more deeply understanding and developing personal creativity. Students will be immersed in an integrated approach to developing theatre artistry through watching, reading and analyzing plays; engaging in the creative process of playmaking and playwriting; and participating in the collaborative process of theatre production. No prior theatre skills necessary. Lecture and studio lab.

How We Tell Stories

What does it mean to tell stories? Why are stories so important to us? How do different media present stories? And what happens when artists, writers and filmmakers shift away from narrative and try to do something other than tell a story? The courses in this theme will explore these questions.

LLC 2025 (LS)

Literature in Translation (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A study of various literatures in translation, from the medieval through the modern period, focusing on the language and culture areas featured in departmental offerings. Course content will vary and may concentrate on poetry, fiction, drama, or a combination. (MULTI CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

PHL 1502

Everyday Philosophy: Aesthetic Perspectives (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An introduction to special problems, topics, or issues in philosophy from aesthetic perspectives. The subject matter of this course will vary. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

THR 2005 (FA)

Page and Stage (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

In this class, students will have the opportunity to learn techniques for analyzing and interpreting written dramatic texts and theatrical performances. They will analyze and interpret plays of different styles from various historical periods, with particular attention to the unique characteristics of drama as a medium for telling stories.

THR 2610 (FA)

Oral Interpretation (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An introduction to the study of literature through the medium of performance. The student is expected to master techniques of literary selection and analysis and to perform from poetry, prose and dramatic literature.

IDS 3210

Exploring the Documentary Form (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

The course offers students a chance to learn the fundamentals of non-fiction story telling. Students will research a topic, and then develop a video, audio, or photographic documentary that uses their research to tell a compelling story. During this course, students will learn a range of techniques that bridge academic disciplines: how to use both primary and secondary sources for research, writing skills to structure their documentaries, visual communication techniques to translate their writing into images, and editing skills to clearly communicate their story.

REL 2020 (LS)

Biblical Literature: The New Testament (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An analysis of early Christian literature as the product of the lives of the first followers of Jesus Christ. Students will have the opportunity to examine selected documents in terms of their literary structure, audience, historical context, religious perspective, and their relation to the broader Christian community and Western culture. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

ENG 2170

Introduction to Film (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A critical examination of notable examples of the filmmaker's art from silent movies up to the modern era, including a variety of film genres and including both American and foreign films. (CORE: HUMANITIES)

C I/ITC 2010

Narrative, New Media, and Gaming (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course addresses the ways in which we tell stories in the digital age. Through exploring storytelling in social media, mobile contexts, and gaming, students in this course will experience a range of different narratives in many types of digital media, such as interactive online stories, podcasts, and video games. We examine forms of digital storytelling within media, marketing, and education, with opportunities for students to research, participate within, and to create original narratives as they share their own stories in a variety of media.

Expressions of Belief

Many performances and works of art and literature express the deeply held beliefs of their creators. Courses in this theme could examine the aesthetic properties of various works and forms that express religious, social, political, and/or personal convictions.

REL 2020 (LS)

Biblical Literature: The New Testament (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An analysis of early Christian literature as the product of the lives of the first followers of Jesus Christ. Students will have the opportunity to examine selected documents in terms of their literary structure, audience, historical context, religious perspective, and their relation to the broader Christian community and Western culture. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

ANT 2300

Meso American Cultures (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

Introduction to the cultures and peoples of Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, and Honduras. Readings and lectures will focus on language, art, and political economy as vehicles for the expression of beliefs.

COM 3315

Political Communication (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

Examines the theoretical and practical aspects of political communication. Topics covered include political debates, speechwriting, political cartoons, communication strategies during and after campaigns, and the role of the media in political communication. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY)

REL 2010 (LS)

Biblical Literature: The Hebrew Scriptures (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An analysis of Old Testament literature as the product of the life of the Hebrew people, students will have the opportunity to examine selected documents in terms of their literary structure, historical context, and religious perspective. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES/LITERATURE)

Social Change Through the Arts

How do artists respond to the world around them? In this theme, students could explore how they might use the performing and visual arts as a response to current social problems and their related cultural, interpersonal, and personal concerns.

THR 2017 (FA)

Theatre for Social Change (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

This course is a practical and seminar class focused on the history and theory behind "theatre for social change" and is grounded in participation, research, analysis, and performance. Students study and apply various theories and methodologies of theatre for social change (image, forum, playback, invisible theatre, etc.) to effect change related to social, economic, cultural, political, and interpersonal issues.

SOC 1100

Social Problems in American Society (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A survey course which examines the major social problems in America today, such as poverty, racism, sexism, aging, militarism and war, environmental abuse, crime, mental illness, drug abuse and alcoholism. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

ART 2019 (FA)

Art for Social Change (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This course combines an introductory studio course with an examination of the way in which art can contribute to social change. Studio assignments will involve students in the investigation, understanding and application of artistic methods and the principles of design while thematically exploring contemporary social issues. Lectures, class discussions and project critiques are geared to develop students' awareness of how art can address social issues. Lecture and studio four hours.

MUS 2613 (FA)

Survey of Western Music (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

A survey of Western music from the Renaissance through the 20th century. Emphasis is placed on style and form of music as perceived by the listener. Lecture three hours. (CORE: HUMANITIES/MUSIC MAJORS ONLY)

The Body: Expression, Presentation And Representation

The body is source, vehicle, and often subject of creative expression. Courses in this theme could explore expression, presentation, and representation of the body as well as concepts of gender and the articulate self.

IDS 2210 (FA)

Bodies, Places, Spaces, Times, and Things (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

Inquiring into the ways in which humans create, transmit and transform meaning materially, this course investigates the physical dimensions of human being - bodies (our own and others'), places, spaces, times, and things - exploring how dimensions of physical existence common to the human species bear variable meanings across personal and cultural boundaries. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSSDISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES or SOCIAL SCIENCES)

DAN 3430 (FA)

Dance History (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

The study of the history of dance from the earliest times to the present. The course will focus on dance in relation to other art forms as well as on the cultural, aesthetic and philosophical influences on dance. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

THR 3640 (FA)

Solo and Group Performance (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An introduction to performance studies, using the principles of oral interpretation. The course begins with the training of the body, voice, and sense memory as well as an introduction to dramatic analysis. The second part of the course uses these performance instruments for solo rehearsal and presentation of student selected literary texts: description, narrative, drama and poetry. The course concludes with ensemble performances of literary texts. (SPEAKING) (CORE: HUMANITIES)

DAN 3435 (FA)

Dance History in the Modern Era (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

A Contemporary Dance History will explore concert dance styles from the 20th century to the present day. Special emphasis will be given to cultural, aesthetic and philosophical influences on contemporary concert dance.

Shaping the Human Environment

As human beings, we constantly shape and reshape our environment; in doing so we shape and reshape our relationship to the aesthetics of that environment. Courses in this theme could explore the relationship of design choices to varied aesthetic systems and media, how humans produce meaning through interaction with designed artifacts, and ways that design can be used for understanding and improving the human condition.

FCS 1000

Apparel and Consumer Behavior (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall

An introductory study of the nature and importance of life styles; communication, economics, psychology, sociology, design and concepts of manufacturing, marketing and retailing as factors which influence consumer acceptance and utilization of fashions.
Lecture three hours.

IND 2012

Product Design (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

This is an introduction to product design and problem-solving techniques. Emphasis is given to history of industrial design, methods for communicating design ideas, systematic design, product design specifications, corporate strategies in planning product innovations, fundamentals of materials and manufacturing processes used in the mass production of consumer products. Students will write multiple reports and give oral presentations throughout the semester. Selected assignments from this course will be appropriate for inclusion in student portfolios. Lecture three hours. (WRITING; SPEAKING)

COM 3531

Mass Media & Society ( credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • On Demand

Creative Expressions of Culture

In this theme, students will explore the various ways a culture, or cultures, use literary, political, social, and artistic forms of creative expression. These forms include, but are not limited to, visual arts, dance, drama, music, film, and poetry. Courses blend an atmosphere of sensory discovery, performance, analysis, inquiry, and collaboration. Courses employ inquiry-based methodologies, cultural immersion, and collaboration as they elevate conceptual knowledge.

WGC 2300-2399

Tangents (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An experiential, interdisciplinary study in the humanities and/or social sciences of the historical, social, literary, cultural, and/or aesthetic perspectives of specific topics. Course content and topics will vary. (WRITING; SPEAKING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES/SOCIAL SCIENCES)

WGC 3300-3399

Junior Seminar (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Fall
  • Spring

An experiential, interdisciplinary study in the humanities and/or social sciences or natural sciences of the historical, social, literary, cultural, aesthetic, and systems analysis perspectives of specific topics. Course content and topics will vary. (WRITING; SPEAKING; MULTI-CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANITIES/SOCIAL SCIENCES)

IDS 2302

Freudian Dreams (3 credit hours)

  • Availability:
  • Spring

This course provides an introduction to dreams and psychoanalytic theory through a study of Sigmund Freud's influential book: The Interpretation of Dreams. The history of thought surrounding dreams, the creative process of dreaming and the transformation of thoughts and words into images, as well as the psychoanalytic interpretations of the social, sexual, and cultural meanings to be found in dreams will be examined and explored. Students will also be introduced to the idea of Freud as critique, as well as to some critiques of Freud's approach to dreams.